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Heinaberg
Heinaberg is a beautiful area that consists of Heinabergsjökull glacier, the glacial lagoon Heinabergslón, where you can go kayaking among the icebergs during summer, and stunning landscape. The Heinaberg area is part of Vatnajökull National Park.  The gorgeous glacial lagoon of Heinaberg, Heinabergslón, is accessible by car and is often studded with large chunks of glacier that break off the Heinabergsjökull glacier. The area offers excellent conditions for hikers, as it has several interesting hiking trails, along which one can see waterfalls, ravines, volcanic intrusions, and even, on a lucky day, a reindeer.   The gravel road from road no 1 to the glacial lake is not in service during the winter months. Therefore, one needs to be aware of changes in road conditions and accessibility. Vatnajökulsþjóðgarður   
Arnarbæli
Arnarbæli is a district in Ölfus, and from the 12th century up until the beginning of the 20th century, it was one of the best fields in Iceland to produce hey.  Now there are significant ruins from the old farm at Arnarbæli that are protected. Due to the wetlands around Arnarbæli, you will find many exciting bird species, such as a Eurasian Oystercatcher, a Red-necked Phalarope, and a Eurasian Wigeon.
Þjórsárdalsskógur Forest
The natural setting of the forest follows a varied landscape of intense contrasts, from flowering forests to unripe ash hake from Hekla. The forest is mostly birch and spruce, pine, and larch mixed forests. An ideal place for outdoor activities, as there are many marked and unmarked paths and forest roads in the woods.  Þjórsárdalsskógur lies west of Highway 32, where it goes east towards Búrfellsvirkjun. You can get into the forest from Ásólfsstaðir and also via a bridge over Sanda, a short way into the valley. The campsite in Þjórsárdalur is in between and is well marked. In Þjórsárdalur, the forest stretches far up the slopes, the landscape is beautiful and varied, and it has a true fairytale atmosphere. There are numerous marked and unmarked paths and trails in the forest for travelers and hikers, rivers to swim in, and lava to explore. In the area, there are paths for wheelchairs, good camping, and a swimming pool in Árnes, about 15 kilometers down in the countryside. Source: skoraekt.is  
Haukafell
Haukafell is a forestry project that was launched in 1985 and now offers ample shelter to the low-lying, local vegetation, which mostly consists of berry bushes that are ripe for picking in August. The area is situated east of Fláajökull glacier and is a popular outdoor area for the locals. There are various hiking trails to be enjoyed in the beautiful surroundings and the crispy fresh air. From Haukafell you find a marked hiking trail to Fláajökull glacier, where you cross a recent walkway over the Kolgrafardalsá river. In Haukafell you find a good campsite in a beautiful area. 
Ósland
Ósland is an island accessible by a manmade isthmus (land bridge) and is situated just a few steps from the harbor area. Ósland was once an island but is now connected to the mainland. It is a conservation area popular for hiking.  There is rich birdlife, and the Arctic Tern is predominant during the nesting season. Ósland is situated just a few steps from the harbor area in Höfn. Walking trails circle the pond, Óslandstjörn, and are along the shore. On the hill, Óslandshæð is a memorial to the fishermen and an information board about the surrounding natural area.  From Ósland, you can follow the nature trail that has been set up to model the solar system – it’s been scaled down and has its sizes and distances in proportion. There are also visible impressions of trees in the basalt rock in the area, trees that have been covered by lava a long time ago. 
The Westman Islands
Westman Islands are also called Vestmannaeyjar. The largest island is called Heimaey and is the only one of the islands that is inhabited. The island was first settled in 930 A.D., although some sources (with evidence supporting) claim that fishing village had been established there 300 years earlier and that, by that time, Irish monks had already been to Heimaey, too. The islands are also the only part of Iceland to have endured violent foreign invasion. In the 15th century, the English came to Iceland to trade and occasionally to raid. They kidnapped one governor of Iceland and killed another, and bought local children, which gave rise to the contemporary legend that Icelanders gave away their children but sold their dogs dearly. Their headquarters were on Heimaey, where they built the fortress Skansinn which still remains. But after a war with the Danes and the Hanseatic League in 1468-73, the English withdrew. A more violent invasion was the “The Turkish Raid” in 1627. Actually, this was launched by Algerians, Moroccan-converted Europeans and commanded by a Dutchman. But as the captives were taken to Algeria, then a suzerainty of the Ottoman Sultan in Constantinople, the raid was blamed on the Turks. It was not until the 1970s that a contemporary law stating that any Turk found in Iceland should be killed on sight was withdrawn. Thankfully, this was never enforced. The Turks killed and captured some 400 people, most of these from Heimaey, and burned down the church and the warehouse. Ten years later, 27 of the captives were ransomed back to Iceland. The place where the Turks came ashore is still called “Ræningjatangi”, or robber’s peninsula. Heimaey has a population of about 4800 residents. Its economy is primarily based on commercial fishing. Over 50 fishing vessels work out from Vestmannaeyjar employing over 500 people. Two large fishing plants and several smaller ones employ another 400 residents.The island has a hospital, retirement home and apartments for the elderly, several nursery schools, two elementary schools and one secondary school. A scientific research institute operates in cooperation with the University of Iceland and the town of Vestmannaeyjar. An eruption on Heimaey in 1973 destroyed 417 houses and the island needed to be evacuated during the night. Over 5000 town residents left in a hurry on sea or air and the eruption added a total of 250 million cubic meters of new volcanic material to the island. To save the port people used sea to stop and re-direct the lava flow and today the Vestmannaeyjar port is good, one of the best in the world in fact. The Vestmannaeyjar´s natural majesty is rich sea and bird life and the island is also home to a burgeoning ecotourism industry. Visitors can tour the island both on land and sea and a visit to the aquarium devoted to local wildlife is an experience one should not miss. The Vestmannaeyjar archipelago is group of 15 islands first formed by volcanic eruptions some 10.000 years ago. The latest island, Surtsey, formed in 1963 in an eruption from the bottom of the ocean. The puffin colony in Vestmannaeyjar is the largest in the world. Millions of Atlantic puffins return to Vestmannaeyjar each spring and summer and provide base for a traditional, seasonal industry. Residents collect puffin eggs and hunt birds using nets, according to an elaborate and age-old set of rules and ethics. Annual catches do not exceed 1% of the total puffin population. The island is well known for cliff-hanging, a sport centuries old and involves climbing and descending the island’s most dramatic rock formations using ropes suspended from the cliff tops. Children and teenagers still practice this sport for its own sake as well as a puffin-hunting technique. Island’s children also save young puffins that have lost their way and direct them to the ocean. They also compete which puffin flies the farthest. Two overlooks with interpretive signage give breathtaking views of Klettsvik Bay and the town of Vestmannaeyjar. East of Eldfell is a monument to Guðlaugur Fridþórsson, who swam for six hours to reach shore in 1984, when his boat sank five kilometers east of Heimaey. At Hamarinn, on western Heimaey, there is a monument to Jón Vigfússon, who in 1928, scaled what is considered an unclimbable vertical cliff after his boat stranded, thereby saving the lives of his comrades as well as his own. A small sanctuary or oasis in the middle of the lava field called Eldfellshraun is cultivated by Erlendur Stefánsson and Guðfinna Ólafsdóttir. It throws into high relief the great contrasts in Vestmannaeyjar landscape. One of the best 18-hole golf courses in Iceland can be found on the island. It is situated in an old volcanic crater under steep cliffs. In spring there is a deep-sea fishing contest and a jazz festival. In summer the islanders host the national soccer tournaments for children and the annual islands festival is in August. Cliff scaling on ropes, can be observed, horses can be rented and many marked hiking trails up volcanoes, over lava fields and through puffin colonies interest visitors. Bird watching is great on the island and the island has a good swimming pool with sauna and hot tubs. A movie about the eruption and rebuilding of the town can be seen and the Folk and Art Museum should not be missed
Fláajökull Glacier
Fláajökull is an outlet glacier from Vatnajökull. The area offers spectacular views of the ever-receding glacier that has receded 2 km during the last one hundred years, leaving a glacial lagoon in its wake. The area is,an excellent destination for all who are interested in witnessing how the movement of the glacier shapes the surrounding landscape. A marked hiking path connects Fláajökull area with the Haukafell forestry project.
Hvalnes
Hvalnes is a small peninsula with a black pebble beach that stretches on for a few kilometers. Sitting on its tip is a picturesque old, yellow lighthouse and an old turf farm with the same name of Hvalnes. The beach stretches for a few kilometers and would make a nice walk or you can just hang out on the beach and enjoy the view. It is an excellent location for bird watching and photography.  
Breiðamerkursandur - Fellsfjara
Next to Jökulsárlón is a less-known attraction within Vatnajökull National Park named -Fellsfjara (Eystri-Fellsfjara on the eastern side of the river and Vestri-Fellsfjara on the western side), which are fields of sand that get strewn with chunks of glacial ice, carried along the river Jökulsá á Breiðamerkursandi, towards the sea and then sent back upon the sands by the tides. The diamond-like pieces of glaciers create a mesmerizing atmosphere in the close mist that often visits the beach. These glistening ice diamonds create an even more spectacular vision in the winter months when the sun comes out and bathes the beach in magical lighting, which reflects off the ice. Waiting around in the darkness for the rising of the sun will be well worth the wait, despite the cold of the Icelandic winter night.   A word of warning: never crawl up on the icebergs and don't choose the ones close to the sea. The photographer must always keep his/her eyes on the sea, or the waves might unexpectedly come in and carry you out to sea. Gamlabúð Visitor Centre, Höfn 
The Flói Bird Reserve
Northwest to the town of Eyrarbakki is a wetland area, rich in birdlife. The reserve has walking paths and a bird hide, an ideal spot for bird watching. The Flói Bird Reserve is listed in the Bird Life international Association. The Reserve is characterized by its flood meadows and numerous small ponds. Approximately 70 species of birds have been recorded in the Reserve. During spring and autumn migration Greylag Geese and White-fronted Geese can be found as well as Wigeon and Tufted Duck and various waders such as Snipe and passerines like Wheatear. During winter, birds, chiefly gulls and sometimes Long-tailed Duck and Common Eider, are concentrated in the estuary of the river Ölfusá. Whooper Swan, Teal, Mallard and Goosander are attracted to open water in winter.
Dyrhólaey
Dyrhólaey is a nature reserve. The protected areas are necessary to ensure protection while ensuring public rights. Some areas are closed for part of the year to preserve wildlife, others are closed all year round due to sensitive natural monuments, traffic is also limited in some areas to people, and others are open all year round. More information about DyrhólaeyDyrhólaey is a 120-meter high promontory not far from Vík. The place got its name from the massive arch that the sea has eroded from the headland. (The name means "door-hole"). When the sea is calm, big boats can sail through it. There has even been a maniacal daredevil pilot that flew through the arch with a small-craft airplane!  From the top of Dyrhólaey, there is a great view. The headland is thought to have been made in an underwater volcanic eruption late in the glacial period, not unlike the eruption of Surtsey. Several outcrops are in the sea; the highest one, called Háidrangur ("High column"), is 56 m. high. Dyrhólaey has been a natural reserve since 1978.  The promontory is widely known among sailors as "Portland" and English trawler fishermen beach where one can climb (at your own risk). According to legend, the Reynisdrangar needles were formed when two trolls were trying to drag a three-masted ship to land. When daylight broke, they turned to stone. The Needles can be seen clearly from the village of Vík and are 66 meters above sea level at their highest.  In one of the many caves here – there is a local legend about a monster having lived here for many centuries. The monster seems to have disappeared after a landslide over 100 years ago…sed to call it a "Blow hole." There are also unique rock formations all along the Birdlife here is abundant, with puffins and eider ducks being the most common species in the area. On top of the cliff, the lighthouse stands impressive and stoic in this often very windy area. Be careful not to go too close to the ledge of this dramatic cliff. 
Birds of South Iceland
Birds of South Iceland is a program offering excellent year-round services for birdwatchers. South Iceland has a great deal to offer visiting birdwatchers with its wide variety of habitats, including wetlands, seabird colonies, highland oases, and unique coastlines.  The largest colonies of puffins, pink-footed geese, and great skuas in the world are located within this region, together with Europe’s largest leach’s storm-petrel colony. South Iceland has a wide range of accommodation from campsites to 4-star hotels and some within a short driving distance from Reykjavik. More information about Birds and birdwatching in Southern Iceland here.  
Fishing in Landmannaafréttur
Many other lakes, apart from Veiðivötn, are located south of Tungnaá, and fishing permits for twelve of them can be bought from the wardens at Landmannahellir. These are the lakes Blautuver, Dómadalsvatn, Eskihlíðarvatn, Frostastaðavatn, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Hnausapollur (Bláhylur), Hrafnabjargavatn, Kílingavötn, Lifrafjallavatn, Ljótipollur, Löðmundarvatn and Sauðleysuvatn. Ljótipollur and Hnausapollur are the youngest of these lakes, with the former dating from 1477 and the latter from 871. Most of these are closed lakes, although Helliskvísl flows out from Löðmundarvatn, and Blautuver and Klingavötn are connected to Tungnaá. Only trout is caught in Ljótapollur, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Lifrarfjallavatn and Dómadalsvatn. Trout and Arctic char is caught in Blautuver, Frostastaðavatn and Kílingavötn, but only Arctic char in other lakes.
Haukadalsskógur Forest
Haukadalsskógur forest is the most highly cultivated of the national forests in Iceland and one of the biggest national forests in South-Iceland. A great outdoor area, with walking trails for wheelchairs as well. 
Vestrahorn/Stokksnes
In Iceland, one of the first settlement farms was Horn, built by Hrollaugur, son of Rögnvaldur Earl of Møre in Norway. The Hornafjörður Municipality and several natural sites are named after the settlement farm. Horn means the same thing in Icelandic and English.  The area is approximately a ten-minute drive away from Höfn. The Horn area is below Vestra-Horn, a 454-meter-high mountain, and it is an interesting geological site composed of un-stratified plutonic rock, mostly gabbro but with some granophyre. East of the mountain is a strange-shaped outcrop called Brunnhorn that stretches out to sea. Seals also tend to hang out on the stretch of sand, so if you’re lucky, you can also catch a picture of a lazing seal.  During the Second World War, the Horn area became a base for the British army, and later a NATO radar station was set up at Stokksnes, south of Horn. At Stokksnes, you can feel the power of the Atlantic Ocean as the waves hit the rocky shore with massive force.  
Jökulsárlón Glacier lagoon
Jökulsárlón is a glacial lagoon by the ring road and was recently designated as a part of Vatnajökull National Park. Its still blue waters are a sight not to be missed, as it is dotted with the icebergs from the edge of Breiðamerkurjökull, a part of the Vatnajökull glacier. The lagoon flows through a narrow gateway into the Atlantic Ocean, leaving the spectacular sight of the large chunks of ice on the black sandy beach. In wintertime, the fish-filled lagoon hosts a number of seals, which visit the lagoon for an easy meal. Year-round curious seals can be seen basking on the blue-tinted icebergs. The lagoon is accessible from the beach all year round, and so is the café on the banks of Jökulsárlón. For hikers, a marked hiking trail between Jökulsárlón and Fjallsárlón is recommended as a scenic trip through unforgettable surroundings. During the summer months the national park offer interpretive tours with a ranger. Check for information at the park homepage or social media. A word of warning - don't jump onto the ice floating in the lagoon. Some tourists think it’s okay to do it, but it is dangerous to play, and the ice can capsize leaving you stuck beneath it in the ice-cold water. So let's be very careful here. Please heed the advice of the locals and never ever step on the ice in the lagoon!   Gamlabúð Visitor Centre, Höfn  Vatnajökulsþjóðgarður 
Hoffell
Hoffell is a farmland area characterized by a large outlet glacier named Hoffellsjökull and gabbro rock. Gabbro rock originated deep in the earth but is visible in the area due to the uplift of the area and glacial erosion, which gives the environment a greenish hue in the otherwise dark rocks. The Hoffell area is 15 kilometers from the town of Höfn. Driving or hiking north from Hoffell along the sands of Hoffellssandur, you will enjoy the spectacular scenery of mountain slopes carved out by earlier glaciers. Along the sands of Hoffellssandur, you will enjoy the stunning scenery of mountain slopes carved out by earlier glaciers. Along the way, a borehole is also constructed to extract geothermal water. Finally, you reach the ice of the glacier tongue, Hoffellsjökull, skirted by the numerous hiking trails of the Geitafell mountain. The area is partly within Vatnajökull National Park, preserved for outdoor recreation and is rich in vegetation, wildlife, and geological variety. The area’s many hiking trails offer a stunning view of the diverse, beautiful wonders it has to offer.