Skip to content

The highlands in Iceland are the gems of the country and contain many of the priceless wonders of the wild nature of Iceland. The landscape, natural forces, and the wildlife are diverse and have something to offer to everyone – experiences and locations that lift the spirit and create unforgettable memories.

Sólheimajökull
Sólheimajökull is an outlet glacier that descends from the southwest corner of Mýrdalsjökull. It is a so-called „climate glacier“ as it responds rather quickly to climate changes. Access to the glacier tongue is good because it reaches down to the lowlands and possible to go hiking on the glaciers with tour operators from the parking lot. Large and rapid changes have taken place on the glacier in recent years, and one clear example of this is the increased distance required to approach the glacier trail. Sólheimajökull has long been a research topic for glaciologists, but glacier research can tell us a lot about climate and climate change over the centuries, but the glacial history of Sólheimajökull is in many ways unusual when compared to other Icelandic glaciers. Over a hundred years ago, the glacial footprints of Sólheimajökull glacier lay considerably in front of the current car park.
Háifoss Waterfall
The waterfall Háifoss is situated near the volcano Hekla in the south of Iceland. The river Fossá, a tributary of Þjórsá, drops here from a height of 122 m. This is the second highest waterfall of the island. For a long time the waterfall had no name, but in 1912 Dr. Helgi Pétursson, a geologist, came and named him.  From the historical farm Stöng, which was destroyed by a volcanic eruption of Hekla in the Middle Ages and reconstructed, it is possible to hike to the waterfall along the Fossá (5 to 6 hours both directions). Above the waterfall, there is also a parking lot, so the hiking can also be made in the other direction.
Þjófafoss waterfall
Þjófafoss is in the river Þjórsá, to the east of Merkurhraun lava field. The name of the waterfall translates as “thieves’ waterfall”, as thieves used to be executed by drowning in its pool. The waterfall is one of the three main waterfalls in Þjórsá. The Þjórsá river forms the boundary between Rangárvallasýsla and Árnessýsla and is the longest river in Iceland. Þjófafoss is to the south of Búrfell mountain, not far from the Búrfell Power Plant and somewhat lower down from Tröllkonuhlaup in Þjórsá. The flowrate in Þjófafoss is rather low during winter but greater during the summer. This is due to the power plants on the river, as a large proportion of the water is diverted past the falls. The river is dammed at Sultartangi, forming the Sultartangalón reservoir. The water is first channelled through Sultartangi Power Plant and then into the Bjarnarlón reservoir and through the Búrfell Power Plant. As a result, it is first and foremost when the Sultartangalón reservoir is full in late summer that the excess water can flow over Þjófafoss. With the construction of the Búrfell Power Plant 2, water flow over Þjófafoss have decrease even more, both during summer and winter.
Þórsmörk
Þórsmörk (Thórsmörk)  is a natural gem that sits between Mýrdalsjökull to the east,  the river Krossá in the south, with Markárfljót and Þröngá Rivers to the north. Its diverse landscape is characterised by impressive gorges, ravines and scruby slopes and a wide variety of vegetation that is unique to the area.  In times past, the farmers of Fljótshlíð and the area under Eyjafjall pastured their sheep all year round, due to the mild climate found within þórsmörk.  Since the 1918 eruption of Katla, Þórsmörk was designated as a Natural Mountain Reserve. There are many curious natural rock formations in the area, such as Snorraríki, Sóttarhellar Cave, Álfakirkja (The Church of the Elves), Stakkholtsgjá Gorge and the stone arch in Stóra Enda. Only large jeeps and buses are able to navigate the road into Þórsmörk, due to the ever changing volume of water which can turn small and easily passable tributaries into tumultuous rivers in matter of hours. 
Vatnajökull Glacier
Vatnajökull is the largest glacier in Iceland, and the largest glacier by volume in the whole of Europe. It covers over 8 percent of Iceland measuring an area of 7,800 km², with an average thickness of 400 m and the highest point, Hvannadalshnúkur, measures at 2,110 m (6,921 ft.). Vatnajökull has around 30 outlet glaciers flowing from the ice cap, all of which bear a name; glaciers and outlet glaciers all have names that end in “jökull” in Icelandic. Vatnajökull belongs to the Vatnajökulsfljóðgarður (Vatnajökull National Park) and covers a large area surrounding the glacier, including the glacier itself. The National Park offers numerous interesting sites to visit and is a must for all who are interested in Geology and beautiful, natural vistas.  
Ófærufoss waterfall - Nyrðri Ófæra river
Ófærufoss is an extremely beautiful waterfall in the river Nyrðri-Ófæra and falls into Eldgjá in two cascades. There used to be a stone arch across the lower one up until the year 1993, when it fell into the river during spring thawing. From Northern Fjallabaksleið it is possible to drive into Eldgjá and walk from there to the Ófærufoss. A road lies up to the eastern edge of Eldgjá. To get there, one needs to cross the river Nyrðri-Ófæra at a wading place, which can be risky. It is safe to recommend a walk up the mountain Gjátindur, from where there is magnificent view of Eldgjá, mountains by Langisjór and Lakagígur and its surroundings. Ófærufoss falls into Eldgjá in Skaftártunguafréttur. Eldgjá is an approx. 40 km long eruptive fissure, approx. 600 meters wide in many places, and up to 200 meters deep. When it was formed, probably around 934, there were likely eruptions along the whole extent of it. The fissure is believed to reach under Mýrdalsjökull glacier. From Eldgjá, extensive streams of lava have flowed through Landbrot and Meðalland, reaching sea at Alviðruhamrar in Álftaver. The lava-field is believed to cover 700 km², which makes it one of the vastest lava-fields on earth in historical times, that is, after the last ice age. Eldgjá is believed to belong to the same crater system as Katla. Eldgjá is a unique natural phenomenon and is listed as natural remnants. Plans to make Eldgjá and its surrounding area a part of Vatnajökull National Park are in place.Theories have surfaced that suggest that the Eldgjá eruptions had even more effect in Europe then the Lakagígar eruptions. According to newly discovered evidence, crop failure, plagues and other disasters occurred in both Europe and the Middle East at that time. It has also been speculated that these eruptions caused more damage than the eruptions of Lakagígar.
Dyrhólaey
Dyrhólaey is a nature reserve. In protected areas is necessary to ensure protection while ensuring public right. Some areas are closed for part of the year to protect wildlife, others are closed all year round due to sensitive natural monuments, traffic in some areas is limited to people and others are open all year round. More information about DyrhólaeyDyrhólaey is a 120-metre high promontory, not far from Vík. The place got its name from the massive arch that the sea has eroded from the headland. (The name literally means "door-hole"). When the sea is calm, big boats can sail through it. There has even been a maniacal daredevil pilot that flew through the arch with a small-craft airplane! From the top of Dyrhólaey there is a great view. The headland is thought to have been made in an underwater volcanic eruption late in the glacial period, not unlike the eruption of Surtsey. Several outcrops are in the sea, the highest one called Háidrangur ("High column") is 56 m. high. Dyrhólaey has been a natural reserve since 1978. The promontory is widely known among sailors as "Portland", and English trawler fishermen ubeach where one can climb (at your own risk). According to legend the Reynisdrangar needles were formed when two trolls were trying to drag a three-masted ship to land. When daylight broke they turned to stone. The Needles can be seen clearly from the village of Vík and are 66 meters above sea level at their highest. In one of the many caves here – there is a local legend about a monster having lived here for many centuries. The monster seems to have disappeared after a landslide over 100 years ago…sed to call it "Blow hole". There are also amazing rock formations all along the Birdlife here is abundant, with puffins and eider ducks being the most common species in the area. The lighthouse on the top of the cliff stands impressive and stoic in this often very windy area. Be careful not to go too close to the ledge of this dramatic cliff. 
Hungurfit in Rangárvallaafréttur
There have been lodge facilities in Hungurfit since 1963, when a mountain lodge, housing 20 people, was built there. This was a great improvement for mountain shepherds, who previously had to sleep in tents.  In 2013, a new mountain lodge was opened in Hungurfit, housing 50 people. It is one of the most modern mountain lodges in Iceland, with running water, a flushable toilet and electricity. Hungurfit has unique natural beauty, and the area is suitable for hiking, jeeping and horse riding. There are excellent horse riding trails leading from the area, both to Rangárbotnar, Sultarfit, Faxi and onto Hvanngil and down to Fljótshlíðarafrétt. It is a day’s journey by horse from Hungurfit to Foss at Rangárvellir. The river Hvítmaga has its source at Hungurfit, and it is highly enjoyable to travel by horse or foot along the river. Above the mountain lodges, the Skyggnishlíðar ridge leads up to the mountain Skyggnir. Skyggnishlíðar is a popular hiking destination, as the view from there is spectacular on a clear day. It is also highly enjoyable to walk or ride to Sultuarfit and towards Gimbragil and Hrútagil or into Jökulskarð.
Kerlingarfjöll Mountains
The mountain massif Kerlingarfjöll (The Giantess Mountains; 800 - 1500 m) is the main ornament in the chain of mountains and glaciers framing the Kjölur area. It covers about 150 km² area southeast of The Temple Glacier (Hofsjökull)  It derives its name from a single, 25 m high and dark hyaloclastite pillar protruding from the light-colored, rhyolite scree of the peak Kerlingartindur. The aforementioned types of rock represent the main structure of the mountain massif and this yellowish tint is the dominant color in the area.The area is full of small steaming hot springs, mud pools, and water fountains. It is truly a hiker's paradise. It is one of the largest geothermal areas in all of Europe and there are future plans to construct a large geothermal steam plant here for electricity to harness the massive amounts of energy stored here. The area is very unique, sensitive, and beautiful - why such a decision may be controversial if proper conservational steps are not taken when doing so.It is recommended to use 4wd vehicles because of the various and changing condition of the tracks and unbridged rivers, which have to be forded with the greatest of care. It is also recommended that people read the special brochure on driving in the interior before heading up there and remember, that off-road driving is strictly forbidden. Many of those who have visited the interior catch the bug and the only remedy is to come back again and again. It is like an incurable disease. Traveling across the interior was common during the Saga period, but after that up to the middle of the 18th century, superstition kept people away. Nowadays - more and more people enjoy this part of the country the whole year-round. The small glacier patches up there have been retreating fast and now the summer skiing school, which was operated for decades, exists no more. Its complex of houses is now being used to accommodate travelers in the area during the summer months.
Höfðabrekkuheiði, Þakgil
A breathtaking 16 km drive from the ring road no. 1 to Þakgil campsite and hiking area. Surrounded by black sand and glacial rivers a gravel road crosses the heath of Höfðabrekka, a tuff ridge between rivers Múlakvísl and Kerlingadalsá formed during the last Ice Age, when volcanic material forced its way from beneath the glacier following a sub-glacial eruption. The road is closed during the winter. The vegetation in this area is extremely vulnerable to trampling, please keep to trails at all times.  
Eldgjá canyon
Eldgjá is an old tectonic graben that was reactivated in a huge eruption in 934-940. The Eldgjá vents form a discontinuous 75 km long volcanic fissure extending from the Katla volcano in the west to Vatnajökull in the east. The eruption in 934-940 takes its name from a spectacular 150 m deep and 8 km long chasm called Eldgjá (fire fissure) that occupies the central part of the vent system. Part of the fissure is under protection of the Vatnajökull National Park. There you can take a walk along the bottom of the fissure and witness the sheer scale of it. An easy hike takes you from the car park (withWC facilities) along the bottom of the fissure to Ófærufoss waterfall. Getting there: you need a 4x4 and the area is only accessible in the summer. This is a site of international geological significance. Ófærufoss is a distinctive two-tiered waterfall cascading into the fissure Eldgjá.  
Dynkur in Thjorsa river
Dynkur in Thjorsa river The waterfalls Hrauneyjarfoss and the sometimes turquoise coloured Sigjaldafoss are both easy to reach. It is also a good idea to drive and see the majestic waterfall Dynkur in the River Thjórsá. The road is signed but it is only suitable for jeeps and off-road vehicles. It is also an excellent trip to drive down to the waterfall Fagrifoss in the Kaldakvísl canyon on the way. There are also many other waterfalls to visit in the waterfilled flowing region.
Hrafntinnusker
Hrafntinnusker in Torfajökull glacier is place you must look at. The English name of this 1128 m high mountain is The Obsidian Skerry. It is situated some distance east of the infamous volcano Hekla. It is accessible by 4wd vehicles from the north and south. The view from Hrafntinnusker is outstanding. Around the mountain, especially to the west, is a large geothermal area. There are fumaroles, multicolored clay hot springs and water hot springs, some of which are evergreen and in some places under a glacier. Ice caves from there, both big and small. The color of this area is diverse and beautiful. East of Hrafntinnusker is the mountain hut of Ferðafélag Íslands, on "Laugavegur", the hiking trail between Landmannalaugar and Þórsmerkur, built in 1977. It seats about 20 people.  
Lónsöræfi
In Lón District, the most eastern area of the Vatnajökull Region, lie the Stafafellsfjöll mountains, also called Lónsöræfi. They dominate the skyline east of Vatnajökull glacier and have long comprised one of Iceland’s most extensive protected areas. Besides the deep, rugged canyons, the landscape displays a wide range of colours owing to the presence of rhyolite and other colourful rocks. In contrast, there are also lushly vegetated and sheltered valleys offering a very good chance of spotting reindeer. The numerous hiking trails make this area perfect for hiking. Keep in mind that getting there can be very difficult and one should seek advice from a visitor- or information centre before attempting to go there.  
Hekla volcano
The volcano Mt. Hekla is Iceland’s most famous volcano and the one that has erupted most frequently in recent years. Mt. Hekla rises 1,491 m over sea level and can widely be seen in the south of Iceland. Hekla has been dubbed the Queen of Icelandic Volcanos and is well known internationally. Considerable superstitions have been attached to the mountain, with the most famous legend being that it is the entrance to Hell and might even be Hell itself. The first documented expedition onto the mountain is from 1750 when the naturalists Eggert Ólaffson and Bjarni Pálsson scaled the mountain. The route to the top of Hekla is quite popular, although hikers must be aware of the danger that can occur if the mountain should erupt. The route taken normally starts from Skjólkvíar. Hekla is located in an area where the South Iceland fracture zone meets the South Iceland volcanic zone, which probably accounts for its frequent eruptions. Hekla has erupted in the following years since Iceland was settled: 1104, 1158, 1206, 1222, 1300, 1341, 1389, 1501, 1597, 1636, 1693, 1766, 1845, 1947, 1970, 1980, 1981, 1991 and 2000. Geologists have repeatedly reiterated in recent years that Hekla is ready to erupt and can erupt at any time. However, the mountain does generally provide an hour’s warning.
Veidivotn Lakes
Veidivötn Lakes are a magnificent highland oasis. They are a friend in the desert, which no one should miss.  The crater formations here are of a true extrarterrestrial character and environment something truly unique. The contrast between black sand and gin clear waters is very unique and many travelers find this to be the highlight of their visit.  This part of the country is among the youngest (1477) and wildest pearls of the central highlands. It comprises about 50 lakes of different sizes, most of which are so-called crater lakes. The area is about 20 km long and 5 km wide and has a southwest - northeast direction. The craters and the lakes lie in two rows. You have to ford the small river between the two Fossvotn lakes to get into the area. Most of the lakes are fed and discharged underground because the lava fields and the scoria are very permeable. Some of the very best brown trout & arctic char fishing in Iceland (or anywhere) is found here. The lakes are rich in natural trout that are believed to be from one of the oldest stocks in Europe. They vary in size, 3-6 pounders being common, but they can occasionally reach up to incredible 25 lbs in size. They are known for their excellent taste, which many say is naturally spiced. Inquire about fishing here well in advance as the area is usually heavily booked. The road from Veidivötn continues north to Jökulheimar on the west of Tungnaarjökull, one of the valley glaciers that "flows" from Vatnajökull. This is a destination that is still somewhat of a well-kept secret and undiscovered by foreign travelers. Usually the road here is open 15 June to the middle of October - only accesible by 4WD vehicles. This is a good place to "get away from it all" - the silence is often total, unbroken even by bird calls.
Mýrdalsjökull glacier and Katla
Mýrdalsjökull Glacier and Katla Volcano Mýrdalsjökull is a glacier located in the south of Iceland. It is situated to the north of Vík í Mýrdal and to the east of the smaller glacier Eyjafjallajökull. Its peak reaches 1493 m in height and in 1980 it covered an area of 595 km². The view on a clear day is one of the prettiest in the world. Guided snow scooter, snowmobile, Super Jeep, dog sledding and iceclimbing tours are offered on the Myrdalsjökull glacier. Travelers on the glacier have to be extremely careful about crevasses and inexperienced travelers should not go there alone. Weather conditions shift very rapidly and high winds and snowstorms can appear in a flash all year round. The volcano Katla, in the Mýrdalsjökull glacier, has erupted on average every 40 - 60 years. Sixteen eruptions have been recorded since the settlement of Iceland, the last in 1918, but there have probably been more. Katla is one of the most famous volcanoes in the country, and its eruptions usually have very serious consequences. It can actually be regarded as one of the most powerful volcanoes in the world and probably the largest active volcano in the northern hemisphere. During the eruption, the glacier above the volcanic vent melts and the melted water collects under the ice-cap until it makes its way out under the edge in a violent flood. These are called "Jokulhlaup". Huge amounts of ice, rocks, silt and sand carried along by the floodwater. Most of the Mýrdalssandur sand plain has been formed by deposits in past floods. Katla has been showing signs of unrest recently and some geologists suspect that it might erupt in the near future, since it is way overdue to erupt. Eruptions of Katla have taken place (since known and recognized human settlement): 1918, 1860, 1823, 1755-56, 1721, 1660-61, 1625, 1612, 1580, 1416, 1357, 1311, 1262, 1245, 1177, 950.
Gjáin in Þjórsárdalur valley
This beautiful natural phenomenon and oasis at the edge of the central highlands should not be passed by if you are traveling in the Thjorsar Valley. The Red River (Rauda) cascades into and through this gorge and the surroundings are amply vegetated. River Thjorsa ran through before a dike was built between the mountains Sandafell and Skeljafell to redirect it. One of the younger Tungnaa-Lavas ran down the gorge leaving a thin layer on its bottom and walls as well as a thicker layer on the edges. The lava formations are worth taking a closer look at. An easy 10 minutes walk takes you into this beautiful area from the archaeological excavations at Stong and another approach is from the car track on the edge. Some find this place so beautiful they (secretly) have strewn their ashes in the river to be forever be united with monumental nature in this "paradise on earth".
Fagrifoss Waterfall
Fagrifoss is a scenic 80 m high waterfall in Geirlandsá River. Basaltic pillows occur in the vicinity of the waterfall which cascades from 140m thick hyaloclastite deposits. Fagrifoss is situated on the F206 road to Laki craters, a rugged road with rivers that can be treacherous to cross if the water level rises due to rain and thaw. A 4x4 vehicle is needed and the area is only accessible during summer.  
Langjökull Glacier
Langjökull is the countries second largest glacier. Its accessibility is as good as it gets, however no one should attempt driving up a´glacier on their own. Many agencies offer tours where they take you up the glacier in specially equipped vehicles with experienced glacier guides. You can choose from jeep excursions, glacier hiking and snowmobiling. 
Hjálparfoss Waterfall
Hjalparfoss is a beautiful, two stepped waterfall near the confluence of Rivers Thjorsa and Fossa in the Thjorsa Valley. The surrounding area is called Hjalp (Help), because the travellers across the Sprengisandur Route found great help in reaching a vegetated area to graze their horses after a long journey in the barren interior. As elsewhere in the valley, the signs of the eruptions of Mt. Hekla are very prominent by the waterfall, ashes everywhere.
Landmannalaugar - Nature Reserve
Landmannalaugar derives its name from a hot pool that rises from under the Laugahraun lava field. Landmannalaugar has been a stopping point for people for centuries, and the mountain shepherds on Landmannaafréttur have stayed there while herding sheep off the mountain for as long as there have been reports of such travel. Many beautiful mountains can be seen from Landmannalaugar: Barmur, Bláhnúkur, Brennisteinsalda, Suðurnám and Norðurnám. There are considerable deposits of rhyolite, obsidian and rhyolite lava in the area, and the Landmannalaugar landscape is famous for its colourfulness and unique environs. The start of one of the most popular hiking trails in Iceland, Laugavegurinn, is at Landmannalaugar. The trail proceeds along Hrafntinnusker, Álftavatn, Hvanngil, Emstrur and ends in Þórsmörk. Ferðafélag Íslands (the Iceland Touring Association) provides facilities, such as showers and accommodation, for travellers at Landmannalaugar. In addition, there is a horse rental and a small café operated during the summer.
The Fjallabak Nature Reserve
The nature reserve is 44,633.4 ha in size and all more than 500 m above sea level. The area is mountainous and shaped by volcanic activity and geothemal heat. The colour palette is broad, mostly due to rhyolite and obsidian in the mountains. Lava fields, rivers and lakes are also prominent in the landscape. Work on the preparation of a management and protection plan for the nature reserve is ongoing, and all information about that work can be accessed in Icelandic. The northern Fjallabaksleið route (F208) lies between Land and Skaftártunga, through the Fjallabak Nature Reserve. The Landmannaleið route (F225) lies from road 26 towards Landsmannahellir through Dómadalur and connects to road 208 by Frostastaðavatn. The Sígölduleið route (208) lies from Sprengisandsvegur (F26) to Landmannalaugar. Weather Conditions
Álftavatn in Rangárvallaafréttur
There are lodges at Álftavatn, and Arctic char can be caught in the lake. Álftavatn is close to places of great natural beauty such as Grashagi, Torfafit, Ljósártungur, Jökultungur, Ófæruhöfði, Útigönguhöfði, Hvanngilshnausar, Torfatindur, Sáta, Brattháls and Hvanngil. The Álftavatn lodge area is part of Laugavegur, one of Iceland’s most popular hiking trails, from Landmannalaugar to Þórsmörk.
Langisjór Lake, Fögrufjöll, Grænifjallgarður
Langisjór is a lake that’s 20 km long and 2 km wide in some places. The lake is to the southwest of Vatnajökull, between the mountains Tungnárfjöll and Fögrufjöll, in a beautiful and picturesque landscape. Its square measure is 27 km², it reaches a depth of 75 m and the water surface is 670 m above sea level.
Eyjafjallajökull Glacier
The Eyjafjallajökull glacier is a 1651 m high glacier-capped stratovolcano. It is one of the smaller glaciers of Iceland. It is situated to the north of Skógar and to the south and west of the bigger glacier Mýrdalsjökull. The icecap of the glacier covers a volcano (1651m in height) that has erupted relatively frequently since the Ice Age. The crater of the volcano has a diameter of 3-4 km and the glacier covers an area of about 100 km². In June 1994 an earthquake swarm lasting for nearly a month occurred below the active volcano Eyjafjallajökull in South Iceland. It is otherwise a relatively quiet volcano – although it is not listed as being inactive. Eyjafjallajökull erupted in 1821-1823. The south end of the mountain was once part of the Atlantic coastline. As the sea has since retreated some 5 km, the former coastline has left behind sheer cliffs with a multitude of beautiful waterfalls, the best known of them being Skógafoss and Seljalandsfoss. In strong winds, the water of some of the smaller falls can even be blown up the mountain. It is one of the three glaciers that surround the Thorsmörk area - the other 2 being Myrdalsjökull and Tindfjallajökull. Specialized tours are arranged on the glacier for both skiing, super jeep tour, and hiking. One should never venture onto the glacier without guides and good knowledge of this kind of activity as this is a very dangerous area for inexperienced visitors. Eyjafjallajökull featured prominently in world news in 2010 when ash from its eruption halted air traffic in Europe. An ice cap with several outlet glaciers covers the caldera of Eyjafjallajökull with a crater diameter 3-4 km wide. The outlet glaciers, Steinholtsjökull and Gígjökull, descend from the main glacier and can be visited by 4x4 trucks along the F-road to Þórsmörk. The area between the glaciers Eyjafjallajökull and Mýrdalsjökull with volcanic craters, Magni and Móði, created in the first stage of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010.   
Fimmvörðuháls
Fimmvörðuháls is situated in between two glaciers, Eyjafjallajökull and Mýrdalsjökull.The hiking trail over Fimmvörðuháls is one of the most popular one in Iceland and even more so now when hikers can explore the eruption sites up there. The trail starts at Skógar and takes us from the beatiful Skógafoss waterfall along the Skógá river. The distance is about 20 km. with estimated hiking time between 8 - 12 hours. Elevation increases and decrease is 1.000 meters. The route is especially beautiful if you walk from south to north, as there are unusually many streams in Skógá and a beautiful view down to Þórsmörk when you cross the ridge. Be prepared for sudden changes in weather since the trail leads us between two glaciers. The eruption at Fimmvörðuháls began on the eve of March 21, 2010. Then there were reports of an eruption with associated ash fall in or near Eyjafjallajökull and the information came from the Police in Hvolsvöllur. The eruption was north of Fimmvörðuháls, just east of Eyjafjallajökull. This eruption is classified as a lava eruption. The lava flow from the eruption fissure formed the highest lava waterfall in the world that flows down into a gorge near the eruption fissure. The lava waterfall was about 200 meters high.
Lakagígar and Laki
Lakagígar is a row of craters, formed in one of the world's largest mixed eruptions in recorded history. This continuous series of eruptions emitted a vast quantity of lava and substantial amounts of volcanic ash from a fissure stretching 25 km across the area west of the ice cap. The craters are regarded as a globally unique phenomenon and are as such a protected natural monument. In 1783, a huge lava flow streamed from Lakagígar in what became known as the “Skaftá Fires.” This is believed to have been one of the greatest lava flows in a single eruption in the history of the world: the molten lava filled the gorges through which the Skaftá and Hverfisfljót rivers flowed, and swept down in two branches into inhabited areas, to spread over the lowlands where it laid waste many farms. The eruption produced large quantities of volcanic ash. For residents of the region, and Iceland as a whole, the results of the eruption were catastrophic: this time is known as “Móðuharðindin” (the Haze Famine).All roads in the western part of the national park are mountain tracks, only navigable for vehicles with four-wheel-drive; some only for large jeeps. Some sections of road are rocky and full of potholes, and loose gravel is common. It is sometimes necessary to ford (drive through) streams and rivers which can become suddenly swollen, making them difficult, or even impossible, to cross. It is dependent on the weather when the roads are opened. Usually they are open from early June, through to the autumn. Driving is only allowed on the roads which are marked on the accompanying map. All other roads or tracks are closed to the public. Here, as elsewhere, driving off-road is totally banned by law.   
Landmannahellir
Landmannahellir in Landmannaafréttur has long been a destination point for travellers passing through the area. The name of the place is drawn from a cave there which was used for centuries to shelter both men and horses. At present, the location is a popular stopping point for both hikers and riders who stay there during the summer. There is, moreover, a campsite at the location. The operation of the area is in the hands of Hellismenn ehf. The company owns a number of huts at the location, as do Veiðifélag Landmannaafréttar and private entities. A well-known hiking trail, Hellismannaleið, lies through the area and has now been signposted from Rjúpnavellir through Áfangagil to Landmannahellir and from there to Landmannalaugar. In order to reach Landmannahellir cave, one needs to use the Dómadalsleið (road F225). The road is approximately 80 km long from Landvegamót to Landmannahellir.
Ljótipollur
Ljótipollur is an explosion crater in the Nature Reserve of Fjallabak and is part of the Veiðivötn volcanic fissure system. It was formed in historical times. Inside the crater, there is a 0,42 km2 and 14 m deep lake. There is trout in the lakebut there is no inlet or outlet to the lake, so it is not clear how the fish got there. The naming of the crater translates to "Ugly Puddle" despite the fact it is an incredibly beautiful site.  
Fishing in Landmannaafréttur
Many other lakes, apart from Veiðivötn, are located south of Tungnaá, and fishing permits for twelve of them can be bought from the wardens at Landmannahellir. These are the lakes Blautuver, Dómadalsvatn, Eskihlíðarvatn, Frostastaðavatn, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Hnausapollur (Bláhylur), Hrafnabjargavatn, Kílingavötn, Lifrafjallavatn, Ljótipollur, Löðmundarvatn and Sauðleysuvatn. Ljótipollur and Hnausapollur are the youngest of these lakes, with the former dating from 1477 and the latter from 871. Most of these are closed lakes, although Helliskvísl flows out from Löðmundarvatn, and Blautuver and Klingavötn are connected to Tungnaá. Only trout is caught in Ljótapollur, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Lifrarfjallavatn and Dómadalsvatn. Trout and Arctic char is caught in Blautuver, Frostastaðavatn and Kílingavötn, but only Arctic char in other lakes.
Stong, Commonwealth Settlement
Some early settlers of Iceland chose the fertile valley of Thjorsádal as the site for their farmsteads. They were unaware of the fact that the tranquil-looking, snow-capped mountain towering on the south was an active volcano. In 1104, there was a massive eruption in Mt. Hekla, and In 1939 Scandinavian archaeologists excavated Stöng and revealed what was left of the smothered Saga-age farm. The findings provided fresh data about the design and construction of Viking long-houses and their evolution up to the 12th century and other valuable information about the period known as the Commonwealth.the settlement in Thjorsádal was buried under tons of volcanic debris and ash. In 1974, on the 1100th anniversary of the settlement of Iceland, architect Hordur Agustsson and a team of historians pieced together the available data and meticulously constructed a replica of Stöng at Skeljastadir, a few kilometers down the valley. The reconstructed farm is called Thjodveldisbaer (Commonwealth Farm), and is perhaps the best representation of Icelandic medieval dwelling. What is actually left of the original farm at Stöng are some stone foundations, now covered by a large protective wooden shelter. Stöng is also known for being the home of the prominent farmer and warrior Gaukur Trandilsson, who according to a brief account in Njáls Saga, was killed by Asgrimur Ellida-Grimsson, his foster-brother, in a duel of honor apparently over Gaukur's affair with a kinswoman of Grimsson. In the 19th century some old bones were discovered in a steep cliff on the north bank of Thjorsá River, further down the valley, supposed to be those of Gaukur from Stöng. The place is called Gaukshofdi (Gaukur's bluff).
Frostastadavatn
Lake Frostastadavatn rests in breathtaking nature and is surrounded by black lava fields and colourful rhyolite mountains. It covers around 2,5km2 and lies at 573 meters above sea level. Access to the lake is very good, road are both on its north and east sides. Like other lakes in this area it is rich of trout and therefore popular by fishingmen as well as hikers who wants fresh catch of the day on their dish at dinner time.
Blahnukur in Landmannalaugar
The very most popular mountain in the Landmannalaugar-region to walk on top on. It´s a 945 m. above sea-level wiewpoint, with a horizont-disc on the top.