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In South Iceland, you can find all kinds of places for all kinds of outdoor activities. There is a lot of variety here and everyone should be able to have a great day in a pleasant environment.

Svartifoss waterfall
Svartifoss is one of the unique waterfalls in South-Iceland. It is situated in Skaftafell, which belongs to Vatnajökull National Park. Svartifoss is a 20 meters (80ft) high. It is bordered on both sides by tall black basalt columns. The hike to Svartifoss starts at the Visitor Centre in Skaftafell. There you can also find all sorts of information and advice about the area. The hike is about 1.9 km or 45 minutes (one way).  
Þjórsárdalsskógur Forest
The natural setting of the forest follows a varied landscape of intense contrasts, from flowering forests to unripe ash hake from Hekla. The forest is mostly birch, as well as spruce, pine and larch mixed forests. An ideal place for outdoor activities, as there is a number of marked and unmarked paths and forest roads in the forest. Þjórsárdalsskógur lies west of highway 32 where it goes east towards Búrfellsvirkjun. You can get into the forest from Ásólfsstaðir and also via a bridge over Sanda spölkorn in the valley. The camp site in Þjórsárdalur is in between and is well marked. In Þjórsárdalur, the forest stretches far up the slopes, the landscape is beautiful, varied and it has a true fairytale atmosphere. In the forest, there are numerous marked and unmarked paths and trails for travelers and hikers, rivers to swim in and lava to explore. In the area there are paths for wheelchairs, good camping and a swimming pool in Árnes about 15 kilometers down in the countryside. Source: skoraekt.is  
Heinaberg
Heinaberg is a beautiful area that consists of Heinabergsjökull glacier, the glacial lagoon Heinabergslón, where you can go kayaking among the icebergs during summer, and stunning landscape. The Heinaberg area is part of Vatnajökull National Park. The gorgeous glacial lagoon of Heinaberg, Heinabergslón, is accessible by car and is often studded with large chunks of glacier that break off the Heinabergsjökull glacier. The area offers excellent conditions for hikers, as it has several interesting hiking trails, along which one can see waterfalls, ravines, volcanic intrusions, and even, on a lucky day, a reindeer.   
Höfðabrekkuheiði, Þakgil
A breathtaking 16 km drive from the ring road no. 1 to Þakgil campsite and hiking area. Surrounded by black sand and glacial rivers a gravel road crosses the heath of Höfðabrekka, a tuff ridge between rivers Múlakvísl and Kerlingadalsá formed during the last Ice Age, when volcanic material forced its way from beneath the glacier following a sub-glacial eruption. The road is closed during the winter. The vegetation in this area is extremely vulnerable to trampling, please keep to trails at all times.  
Hallskot - Recreation Forest
A recreation area north of Eyrarbakki in supervision of the forestry community of Eyrarbakki, Skógræktarfélag Eyrarbakka. In Hallskot is a perfect picnic area with benches and tables where one can always find a windless spot in the groves. ADDRESS: 820 EYRARBAKKI / TEL: (+354) 660 6130, (+354) 847 5028 SKOGRAEKTARFELAGEYRARBAKKA@GMAIL.COM / GPS: 63°53'57.0"N 21°10'19.1"W
Hella
Hella is the municipality’s main population centre, with over 800 residents. The economy of Hella consists mainly of services to the agricultural sector. The town hosts a slaughterhouse for large livestock, a meat processing plant, chicken slaughterhouse and adjacent processing plant, veterinary centre, incubation station, automobile workshop, electrical workshop, woodworking shop and various other smaller agricultural service providers. Hella also has a grocery store, restaurants, hotel and guesthouses, nursing and retirement homes, swimming pool, laundry, healthcare centre, glass workshop, fish processing and seafood store, electrical appliance and gift store, bank, post office, camping ground, pharmacy, tyre shop, gas station, sports facilities, primary and nursery schools, as well as various other services and public bodies. In addition, the town hall and service centre for the municipality are located in Hella. Hella’s history began in 1927, when a shop was opened at the location. It was later replaced by the co-operative society Þór, and as the co-op grew and prospered, Hella became the main trading centre in the western part of the Rangárvallasýsla region, extending across the farmlands Gaddstaðir, Helluvað and Nes at Rangárvellir. The village grew considerably in the sixties when many of the people working on the development of power plants in the area built homes and settled there. Growth slowed down after that, but since the turn of the century, Hella has grown steadily, with new apartments being constructed every year. One of the best-known equine sports facilities in Iceland is located in Hella: Gaddstaðaflatir, also known as Rangárbakkar. The facilities include competition pitches for riding sports as well as an indoor riding arena. Five national meets have been held there, in 1986, 1994, 2004, 2008 and 2014, and the sixth is planned in 2021.
The Westman Islands
Westman Islands are also called Vestmannaeyjar. The largest island is called Heimaey and is the only one of the islands that is inhabited. The island was first settled in 930 A.D., although some sources (with evidence supporting) claim that fishing village had been established there 300 years earlier and that, by that time, Irish monks had already been to Heimaey, too. The islands are also the only part of Iceland to have endured violent foreign invasion. In the 15th century, the English came to Iceland to trade and occasionally to raid. They kidnapped one governor of Iceland and killed another, and bought local children, which gave rise to the contemporary legend that Icelanders gave away their children but sold their dogs dearly. Their headquarters were on Heimaey, where they built the fortress Skansinn which still remains. But after a war with the Danes and the Hanseatic League in 1468-73, the English withdrew. A more violent invasion was the “The Turkish Raid” in 1627. Actually, this was launched by Algerians, Moroccan-converted Europeans and commanded by a Dutchman. But as the captives were taken to Algeria, then a suzerainty of the Ottoman Sultan in Constantinople, the raid was blamed on the Turks. It was not until the 1970s that a contemporary law stating that any Turk found in Iceland should be killed on sight was withdrawn. Thankfully, this was never enforced. The Turks killed and captured some 400 people, most of these from Heimaey, and burned down the church and the warehouse. Ten years later, 27 of the captives were ransomed back to Iceland. The place where the Turks came ashore is still called “Ræningjatangi”, or robber’s peninsula. Heimaey has a population of about 4800 residents. Its economy is primarily based on commercial fishing. Over 50 fishing vessels work out from Vestmannaeyjar employing over 500 people. Two large fishing plants and several smaller ones employ another 400 residents.The island has a hospital, retirement home and apartments for the elderly, several nursery schools, two elementary schools and one secondary school. A scientific research institute operates in cooperation with the University of Iceland and the town of Vestmannaeyjar. An eruption on Heimaey in 1973 destroyed 417 houses and the island needed to be evacuated during the night. Over 5000 town residents left in a hurry on sea or air and the eruption added a total of 250 million cubic meters of new volcanic material to the island. To save the port people used sea to stop and re-direct the lava flow and today the Vestmannaeyjar port is good, one of the best in the world in fact. The Vestmannaeyjar´s natural majesty is rich sea and bird life and the island is also home to a burgeoning ecotourism industry. Visitors can tour the island both on land and sea and a visit to the aquarium devoted to local wildlife is an experience one should not miss. The Vestmannaeyjar archipelago is group of 15 islands first formed by volcanic eruptions some 10.000 years ago. The latest island, Surtsey, formed in 1963 in an eruption from the bottom of the ocean. The puffin colony in Vestmannaeyjar is the largest in the world. Millions of Atlantic puffins return to Vestmannaeyjar each spring and summer and provide base for a traditional, seasonal industry. Residents collect puffin eggs and hunt birds using nets, according to an elaborate and age-old set of rules and ethics. Annual catches do not exceed 1% of the total puffin population. The island is well known for cliff-hanging, a sport centuries old and involves climbing and descending the island’s most dramatic rock formations using ropes suspended from the cliff tops. Children and teenagers still practice this sport for its own sake as well as a puffin-hunting technique. Island’s children also save young puffins that have lost their way and direct them to the ocean. They also compete which puffin flies the farthest. Two overlooks with interpretive signage give breathtaking views of Klettsvik Bay and the town of Vestmannaeyjar. East of Eldfell is a monument to Guðlaugur Fridþórsson, who swam for six hours to reach shore in 1984, when his boat sank five kilometers east of Heimaey. At Hamarinn, on western Heimaey, there is a monument to Jón Vigfússon, who in 1928, scaled what is considered an unclimbable vertical cliff after his boat stranded, thereby saving the lives of his comrades as well as his own. A small sanctuary or oasis in the middle of the lava field called Eldfellshraun is cultivated by Erlendur Stefánsson and Guðfinna Ólafsdóttir. It throws into high relief the great contrasts in Vestmannaeyjar landscape. One of the best 18-hole golf courses in Iceland can be found on the island. It is situated in an old volcanic crater under steep cliffs. In spring there is a deep-sea fishing contest and a jazz festival. In summer the islanders host the national soccer tournaments for children and the annual islands festival is in August. Cliff scaling on ropes, can be observed, horses can be rented and many marked hiking trails up volcanoes, over lava fields and through puffin colonies interest visitors. Bird watching is great on the island and the island has a good swimming pool with sauna and hot tubs. A movie about the eruption and rebuilding of the town can be seen and the Folk and Art Museum should not be missed
Haukafell
Haukafell is a forestry project that was launched in 1985 and now offers ample shelter to the low-lying, local vegetation, which mostly consists of berry-bushes that are ripe for picking in August. The area is situated east of Fláajökull glacier and is a popular outdoor area for the locals. There are various hiking trails to be enjoyed in the beautiful surroundings and the crispy fresh air. FromHaukafell you find a marked hiking trail to Fláajökull glacier, where you cross a recent walkway over the Kolgrafardalsá river. In Haukafell you find a good campsite in a beautiful area.   
Knarrarósviti Lighthouse
Built-in 1938-1939, the lighthouse was the first one in Iceland to be built out of reinforced concrete. For a long time, the lighthouse was the tallest building in South Iceland, 26,2 meters (86 feet) high. It was designed by the engineer Axel Sveinsson as a blend of functionalism and art nouveau (jugendstil).  In summertime (mid of June to start August) the lighthouse is open every day. Knarrarósviti lighthouse is part of the beautiful South Coast Lighthouse trail that you can find more information about here. 
Herjolfsdalur
Herjólfsdalur is northwest of Heimaey, surrounded by mountains both to the north and east sides. Þjóðhátíð or The National Festival is held there every year, the first weekend in August. The Vestmannaeyjar National Festival was first held in 1874, when the national festival was held in many parts of Iceland to celebrate the new constitution and commemorate the 1000th anniversary of the country's settlement, hence the name. This celebration has been held annually since except the years 1973 and 1974 and now 2020. It is believed that Heimaey’s first farm was built here by the settler Herjólfur Bárðarson, for whom the valley is named. Excavations have revealed remains of a Norse house where a replica now stands. The island’s campsite is also here.In the years 1971-1981, extensive and detailed archaeological research was carried out on the ruins of a house in Herjólfsdalur, which had previously been little researched in 1924. These studies have conclusively shown that permanent settlements have been established in the Westman Islands before the earlier settlement in Iceland. in 874.In Herjólfsdalur is Daltjörn. It is formed by drainage from Lindinn, which was one of the best springs on Heimaey.  
Skaftafell
Scenic nature, favorable weather conditions and a network of hiking trails make Skaftafell an ideal destination to enjoy outdoor activities in Icelandic nature. Short and easy trails lead to the waterfall Svartifoss and Skaftafellsjökull glacier, but for those who want to reach further out Morsárdalur valley and Kristínartindar mountain peaks are perfect in terms of distance and labour. Skaftafell is also the perfect base camp for those who seek to climb Iceland‘s highest mountain peak, Hvannadalshnúkur. Private travel companies operate in Skaftafell and offer guided hikes on the nearby glaciers and mountains. Also on offer are sightseeing flights over Vatnajökull glacier and other renowned attractions.
The Flói Bird Reserve
Northwest to the town of Eyrarbakki is a wetland area, rich in birdlife. The reserve has walking paths and a bird hide, an ideal spot for bird watching. The Flói Bird Reserve is listed in the Bird Life international Association. The Reserve is characterized by its flood meadows and numerous small ponds. Approximately 70 species of birds have been recorded in the Reserve. During spring and autumn migration Greylag Geese and White-fronted Geese can be found as well as Wigeon and Tufted Duck and various waders such as Snipe and passerines like Wheatear. During winter, birds, chiefly gulls and sometimes Long-tailed Duck and Common Eider, are concentrated in the estuary of the river Ölfusá. Whooper Swan, Teal, Mallard and Goosander are attracted to open water in winter.
Thingvallavatn Lake
Lake Thingvallavatn lies in a rift valley that extends south from the Langjokull glacier to mount Hengill, and from Botnssulur mountains in the west to Lyngdalsheidi heath in the east. The lake is the largest natural lake in Iceland, about 84 square kilometres, at an altitude of about 100 metres above sea level. The deepest part of the lake measures 114 metres, which means that it reaches below sea level.The catchment area of Lake Thingvallavatn, about 1300 square kilometres, lies in the same directions as the fissure in the area and its existence is closely connected with the geological history.The water in the lake is very cold and therefore very pure so snorkling and diving are popular in it. Silfra, one of the fissures in the northern part of the lake is one of the most popular diving spots in Iceland due to this.
Þórsmörk
Þórsmörk (Thórsmörk)  is a natural gem that sits between Mýrdalsjökull to the east,  the river Krossá in the south, with Markárfljót and Þröngá Rivers to the north. Its diverse landscape is characterised by impressive gorges, ravines and scruby slopes and a wide variety of vegetation that is unique to the area.  In times past, the farmers of Fljótshlíð and the area under Eyjafjall pastured their sheep all year round, due to the mild climate found within þórsmörk.  Since the 1918 eruption of Katla, Þórsmörk was designated as a Natural Mountain Reserve. There are many curious natural rock formations in the area, such as Snorraríki, Sóttarhellar Cave, Álfakirkja (The Church of the Elves), Stakkholtsgjá Gorge and the stone arch in Stóra Enda. Only large jeeps and buses are able to navigate the road into Þórsmörk, due to the ever changing volume of water which can turn small and easily passable tributaries into tumultuous rivers in matter of hours. 
Einbúi, Oddgeirshólar
A beautiful sports and outdoor recreational area on the banks of Hvítá River. The area is owned by the Youth Association Baldur.
Haukadalsskógur Forest
Haukadalsskógur forest is the most highly cultivated of the national forests in Iceland and one of the biggest national forests in South-Iceland. A great outdoor area, with walking trails for wheelchairs as well. 
Hoffell
Hoffell is a farmland area characterized by a large outlet glacier named Hoffellsjökull and gabbro rock. Gabbro rock is originated deep in the Earth but is visible in the area due to the uplift of the area and glacial erosion, which gives the environment a greenish hue in the otherwise dark rocks. Hoffell is an area and a farmland in southeast Iceland. It is characterised by a large outlet glacier, Hoffellsjökull, and gabbro rock, which originally formed deep in the earth‘s crust but is now visible due to uplift of the area and glacial erosion, which gives the environment a greenish hue in the otherwise dark rocks. The Hoffell area is 15 kilometres from the town of Höfn.Driving or hiking north from Hoffell along the sands of Hoffellssandur you will enjoy the spectacular scenery of mountain slopes carved out by earlier glaciers. Along the sands of Hoffellssandur you will enjoy the spectacular scenery of mountain slopes carved out by earlier glaciers. Along the way, there is also a borehole, constructed to extract geothermal water. Finally, you reach the ice of the glacier-tongue, Hoffellsjökull, skirted by the numerous hiking trails of the Geitafell mountain.The area is preserved for outdoor recreation, as it is rich in vegetation, wildlife, and geological variety. The area’s many hiking trails offer a stunning view of the diverse beautiful wonders it has to offer.  
Landmannalaugar - Nature Reserve
Landmannalaugar derives its name from a hot pool that rises from under the Laugahraun lava field. Landmannalaugar has been a stopping point for people for centuries, and the mountain shepherds on Landmannaafréttur have stayed there while herding sheep off the mountain for as long as there have been reports of such travel. Many beautiful mountains can be seen from Landmannalaugar: Barmur, Bláhnúkur, Brennisteinsalda, Suðurnám and Norðurnám. There are considerable deposits of rhyolite, obsidian and rhyolite lava in the area, and the Landmannalaugar landscape is famous for its colourfulness and unique environs. The start of one of the most popular hiking trails in Iceland, Laugavegurinn, is at Landmannalaugar. The trail proceeds along Hrafntinnusker, Álftavatn, Hvanngil, Emstrur and ends in Þórsmörk. Ferðafélag Íslands (the Iceland Touring Association) provides facilities, such as showers and accommodation, for travellers at Landmannalaugar. In addition, there is a horse rental and a small café operated during the summer.