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Find a list of activities to do when your traveling with children.

Skaftafell
Scenic nature, favorable weather conditions and a network of hiking trails make Skaftafell an ideal destination to enjoy outdoor activities in Icelandic nature. Short and easy trails lead to the waterfall Svartifoss and Skaftafellsjökull glacier, but for those who want to reach further out Morsárdalur valley and Kristínartindar mountain peaks are perfect in terms of distance and labour. Skaftafell is also the perfect base camp for those who seek to climb Iceland‘s highest mountain peak, Hvannadalshnúkur. Private travel companies operate in Skaftafell and offer guided hikes on the nearby glaciers and mountains. Also on offer are sightseeing flights over Vatnajökull glacier and other renowned attractions.
Reykjadalur valley
Reykjadalur valley is the most popular and arguably the most beautiful hiking area in Ölfus. Hot springs and colourful areas full of geothermal activity entertain along a hiking trail which leads to a hot river. For some of the length of the river the temperature in it is perfect for bathing and that's a wonderful natural experience. The trail by Reykjadalur can be closed so it's good to chech the conditions before going. To check out whether the valley is open or closed to visitors check out the website of Safetravel.is. Those who plan on visiting the valley need respect the rules and stay on the paths. Please help us to protect the fragile vegetation around the area!  
Keldur at Rangárvellir
Keldur is a historic settlement where Jón Loftsson, the chief of the Oddaverjar clan, lived during the last years of his life. Keldur also had a Catholic monastery. There is a medieval-type turf farm at the site, the only large turf farm that has been preserved in South Iceland. There is an underground tunnel leading from the hall, thought to date from the 12th or 13th century, which was probably built as an escape during a time of conflict. Although most of the houses date from the 19th century, the oldest part of the farm building is the oldest preserved part of a turf farm in Iceland. A number of outhouses have also been preserved at the farm. There is also a church there, built by constable Guðmundur Brynjólfsson in 1875. The church is built of timber and clad with iron. The pulpit, altar and candle arms were built by Hjörtur Oddsson, joiner and farmer at Eystri-Kirkjubær. The altarpiece illustrates the Last Supper and is by Ámundi Jónsson, joiner in Syðra-Langholt. The church underwent repairs in 1956–1957. Gréta and Jón Björnsson painted and decorated the church, like they did with the church at Oddi. Keldur derives its name from the springs that can be found in the farmland. The farm and its occupants are mentioned in many works of medieval literature, including Njal’s Saga, Sturlunga Saga and the Saga of Saint Thorlákur. The old farm at Keldur is managed by the National Museum of Iceland and can be visited daily during the summer.
Þórsmörk
Þórsmörk (Thórsmörk)  is a natural gem that sits between Mýrdalsjökull to the east,  the river Krossá in the south, with Markárfljót and Þröngá Rivers to the north. Its diverse landscape is characterised by impressive gorges, ravines and scruby slopes and a wide variety of vegetation that is unique to the area.  In times past, the farmers of Fljótshlíð and the area under Eyjafjall pastured their sheep all year round, due to the mild climate found within þórsmörk.  Since the 1918 eruption of Katla, Þórsmörk was designated as a Natural Mountain Reserve. There are many curious natural rock formations in the area, such as Snorraríki, Sóttarhellar Cave, Álfakirkja (The Church of the Elves), Stakkholtsgjá Gorge and the stone arch in Stóra Enda. Only large jeeps and buses are able to navigate the road into Þórsmörk, due to the ever changing volume of water which can turn small and easily passable tributaries into tumultuous rivers in matter of hours. 
Ölfus black sand beach
Ölfus has a black sand beach that stretches from Thorlákshöfn to Ölfusa river. A long walk on the beach surrounded by black sand and lyme grass is the perfect way to unwind from the day to day stress. The beach is also a popular surfing spot and the waves are suitable for those taking their first steps at surfing. For more advanced surfers the waves by the lighthouse in Thorlákshöfn are superb. 
Herjolfsdalur
Herjólfsdalur is northwest of Heimaey, surrounded by mountains both to the north and east sides. Þjóðhátíð or The National Festival is held there every year, the first weekend in August. The Vestmannaeyjar National Festival was first held in 1874, when the national festival was held in many parts of Iceland to celebrate the new constitution and commemorate the 1000th anniversary of the country's settlement, hence the name. This celebration has been held annually since except the years 1973 and 1974 and now 2020. It is believed that Heimaey’s first farm was built here by the settler Herjólfur Bárðarson, for whom the valley is named. Excavations have revealed remains of a Norse house where a replica now stands. The island’s campsite is also here.In the years 1971-1981, extensive and detailed archaeological research was carried out on the ruins of a house in Herjólfsdalur, which had previously been little researched in 1924. These studies have conclusively shown that permanent settlements have been established in the Westman Islands before the earlier settlement in Iceland. in 874.In Herjólfsdalur is Daltjörn. It is formed by drainage from Lindinn, which was one of the best springs on Heimaey.  
Geothermal area in Hveragerdi
Right inside the town of Hveragerði is an area of hot springs from which the community derives its name (hver = hot spring). The hot springs of Hveragerði are among the most remarkable natural attractions og south Iceland. Visitors to the Geothermal Area can learn about geothermal energy and the springs, which include Eilífur, a geysir which erupts regulary, Ruslahver which has an interesting history. You can also boil an egg in the area and try the hot spring bread.“   April May June July August September Weekdays 09:00- 17:00 09:00- 17:00 09:00-18:00 09:00-18:00 09:00-18:00 09:00-17:00 Saturdays Closed 09:00- 17:00* 09:00-18:00 09:00-18:00 09:00-18:00 09:00-17:00 Sundays Closed Closed 10:00-16:00 10:00-16:00 10:00-16:00 Closed *From 15th May                         During winter we welcome groups upon request         Telephonenumber: +354 4835062  https://www.facebook.com/Geothermalpark/
The Westman Islands
Westman Islands are also called Vestmannaeyjar. The largest island is called Heimaey and is the only one of the islands that is inhabited. The island was first settled in 930 A.D., although some sources (with evidence supporting) claim that fishing village had been established there 300 years earlier and that, by that time, Irish monks had already been to Heimaey, too. The islands are also the only part of Iceland to have endured violent foreign invasion. In the 15th century, the English came to Iceland to trade and occasionally to raid. They kidnapped one governor of Iceland and killed another, and bought local children, which gave rise to the contemporary legend that Icelanders gave away their children but sold their dogs dearly. Their headquarters were on Heimaey, where they built the fortress Skansinn which still remains. But after a war with the Danes and the Hanseatic League in 1468-73, the English withdrew. A more violent invasion was the “The Turkish Raid” in 1627. Actually, this was launched by Algerians, Moroccan-converted Europeans and commanded by a Dutchman. But as the captives were taken to Algeria, then a suzerainty of the Ottoman Sultan in Constantinople, the raid was blamed on the Turks. It was not until the 1970s that a contemporary law stating that any Turk found in Iceland should be killed on sight was withdrawn. Thankfully, this was never enforced. The Turks killed and captured some 400 people, most of these from Heimaey, and burned down the church and the warehouse. Ten years later, 27 of the captives were ransomed back to Iceland. The place where the Turks came ashore is still called “Ræningjatangi”, or robber’s peninsula. Heimaey has a population of about 4800 residents. Its economy is primarily based on commercial fishing. Over 50 fishing vessels work out from Vestmannaeyjar employing over 500 people. Two large fishing plants and several smaller ones employ another 400 residents.The island has a hospital, retirement home and apartments for the elderly, several nursery schools, two elementary schools and one secondary school. A scientific research institute operates in cooperation with the University of Iceland and the town of Vestmannaeyjar. An eruption on Heimaey in 1973 destroyed 417 houses and the island needed to be evacuated during the night. Over 5000 town residents left in a hurry on sea or air and the eruption added a total of 250 million cubic meters of new volcanic material to the island. To save the port people used sea to stop and re-direct the lava flow and today the Vestmannaeyjar port is good, one of the best in the world in fact. The Vestmannaeyjar´s natural majesty is rich sea and bird life and the island is also home to a burgeoning ecotourism industry. Visitors can tour the island both on land and sea and a visit to the aquarium devoted to local wildlife is an experience one should not miss. The Vestmannaeyjar archipelago is group of 15 islands first formed by volcanic eruptions some 10.000 years ago. The latest island, Surtsey, formed in 1963 in an eruption from the bottom of the ocean. The puffin colony in Vestmannaeyjar is the largest in the world. Millions of Atlantic puffins return to Vestmannaeyjar each spring and summer and provide base for a traditional, seasonal industry. Residents collect puffin eggs and hunt birds using nets, according to an elaborate and age-old set of rules and ethics. Annual catches do not exceed 1% of the total puffin population. The island is well known for cliff-hanging, a sport centuries old and involves climbing and descending the island’s most dramatic rock formations using ropes suspended from the cliff tops. Children and teenagers still practice this sport for its own sake as well as a puffin-hunting technique. Island’s children also save young puffins that have lost their way and direct them to the ocean. They also compete which puffin flies the farthest. Two overlooks with interpretive signage give breathtaking views of Klettsvik Bay and the town of Vestmannaeyjar. East of Eldfell is a monument to Guðlaugur Fridþórsson, who swam for six hours to reach shore in 1984, when his boat sank five kilometers east of Heimaey. At Hamarinn, on western Heimaey, there is a monument to Jón Vigfússon, who in 1928, scaled what is considered an unclimbable vertical cliff after his boat stranded, thereby saving the lives of his comrades as well as his own. A small sanctuary or oasis in the middle of the lava field called Eldfellshraun is cultivated by Erlendur Stefánsson and Guðfinna Ólafsdóttir. It throws into high relief the great contrasts in Vestmannaeyjar landscape. One of the best 18-hole golf courses in Iceland can be found on the island. It is situated in an old volcanic crater under steep cliffs. In spring there is a deep-sea fishing contest and a jazz festival. In summer the islanders host the national soccer tournaments for children and the annual islands festival is in August. Cliff scaling on ropes, can be observed, horses can be rented and many marked hiking trails up volcanoes, over lava fields and through puffin colonies interest visitors. Bird watching is great on the island and the island has a good swimming pool with sauna and hot tubs. A movie about the eruption and rebuilding of the town can be seen and the Folk and Art Museum should not be missed
Reykjafoss in the Botanical Garden in Hveragerði
The Botanical garden in Hveragerði is in the center of the town. Since 1983 it has given people the chance to relax and enjoy nature amongst the trees and the wonderful river Varmá with the waterfall Reykjafoss right next to the garden. Further along the river a hiking trail goes past ruins of an old wool factory and ruins of a hydro-electric powerplant surrounded by colourful hot-spring areas.  
Hellisskógur forest
Hellisskógur is a small forest just outside of the town Selfoss. In Hellisskógur are roads and walking paths around the area and benches so visitors can relax and enjoy the area.   The cave in Hellisskógur forest was formed at a latter glacial period by sea erosion. Sea levels have been higher than now several times and signs of sea erosion can be seen on more cliffs in the area which are made of around 0, 7 – 3, 1 million year old basalt. The cave was previously used to store hay in the back and as a sheepcote in the front. It was once believed that the cave was haunted by a ghost wearing a blue scarf. The story tells of a young man who was broken hearted and hung himself in the cave using a long blue scarf.  Here is a map of Hellisskógur 
Gjáin in Þjórsárdalur valley
This beautiful natural phenomenon and oasis at the edge of the central highlands should not be passed by if you are traveling in the Thjorsar Valley. The Red River (Rauda) cascades into and through this gorge and the surroundings are amply vegetated. River Thjorsa ran through before a dike was built between the mountains Sandafell and Skeljafell to redirect it. One of the younger Tungnaa-Lavas ran down the gorge leaving a thin layer on its bottom and walls as well as a thicker layer on the edges. The lava formations are worth taking a closer look at. An easy 10 minutes walk takes you into this beautiful area from the archaeological excavations at Stong and another approach is from the car track on the edge. Some find this place so beautiful they (secretly) have strewn their ashes in the river to be forever be united with monumental nature in this "paradise on earth".
Skagaás grove
Skagás is a beautiful grove in serene surroundings. It’s easily accessible and open for everyone but please take care not to leave any litter behind. Barbequing is allowed only in a specially designated area due to fire hazard.
Gluggafoss waterfall
The Merkjá River has several beautiful waterfalls, but the most outstanding is Gluggafoss or Window Falls. (also known as Merkjárfoss) The upper half of the cliff is palagonite or tuff rock and the lower ledge is basalt. The river has formed tunnels and grooves through the soft rock and a series of ‘windows’ in the tunnels, thereby earning the name ‘Gluggafoss’. At the very top of the falls, the river passes under a stone arch. As the rock is rather soft, the waterfall has changed over time. Around 1947 the upper half of the waterfall could hardly be seen, as the water flowed into a vertical tunnel behind the cliff. It was only visible through three different openings or ‘windows’ one above the other. The water came out through the bottom ‘window’, forming a beautiful arch, except when the water rose in the river, forcing it through all three windows. Further changes occurred when Hekla erupted in 1947, causing a 20 cm thick layer of volcanic ash to be carried downstream by the river. The vertical tunnel formation nearly disappeared as it filled with ash. It has taken nearly 50 years for the falls to return to its former glory. More geosites in the neighbourhood: www.katlageopark.com 
Hallskot - Recreation Forest
A recreation area north of Eyrarbakki in supervision of the forestry community of Eyrarbakki, Skógræktarfélag Eyrarbakka. In Hallskot is a perfect picnic area with benches and tables where one can always find a windless spot in the groves. ADDRESS: 820 EYRARBAKKI / TEL: (+354) 660 6130, (+354) 847 5028 SKOGRAEKTARFELAGEYRARBAKKA@GMAIL.COM / GPS: 63°53'57.0"N 21°10'19.1"W
Fishing in Landmannaafréttur
Many other lakes, apart from Veiðivötn, are located south of Tungnaá, and fishing permits for twelve of them can be bought from the wardens at Landmannahellir. These are the lakes Blautuver, Dómadalsvatn, Eskihlíðarvatn, Frostastaðavatn, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Hnausapollur (Bláhylur), Hrafnabjargavatn, Kílingavötn, Lifrafjallavatn, Ljótipollur, Löðmundarvatn and Sauðleysuvatn. Ljótipollur and Hnausapollur are the youngest of these lakes, with the former dating from 1477 and the latter from 871. Most of these are closed lakes, although Helliskvísl flows out from Löðmundarvatn, and Blautuver and Klingavötn are connected to Tungnaá. Only trout is caught in Ljótapollur, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Lifrarfjallavatn and Dómadalsvatn. Trout and Arctic char is caught in Blautuver, Frostastaðavatn and Kílingavötn, but only Arctic char in other lakes.
Haukadalsskógur Forest
Haukadalsskógur forest is the most highly cultivated of the national forests in Iceland and one of the biggest national forests in South-Iceland. A great outdoor area, with walking trails for wheelchairs as well. 
Hella
Hella is the municipality’s main population centre, with over 800 residents. The economy of Hella consists mainly of services to the agricultural sector. The town hosts a slaughterhouse for large livestock, a meat processing plant, chicken slaughterhouse and adjacent processing plant, veterinary centre, incubation station, automobile workshop, electrical workshop, woodworking shop and various other smaller agricultural service providers. Hella also has a grocery store, restaurants, hotel and guesthouses, nursing and retirement homes, swimming pool, laundry, healthcare centre, glass workshop, fish processing and seafood store, electrical appliance and gift store, bank, post office, camping ground, pharmacy, tyre shop, gas station, sports facilities, primary and nursery schools, as well as various other services and public bodies. In addition, the town hall and service centre for the municipality are located in Hella. Hella’s history began in 1927, when a shop was opened at the location. It was later replaced by the co-operative society Þór, and as the co-op grew and prospered, Hella became the main trading centre in the western part of the Rangárvallasýsla region, extending across the farmlands Gaddstaðir, Helluvað and Nes at Rangárvellir. The village grew considerably in the sixties when many of the people working on the development of power plants in the area built homes and settled there. Growth slowed down after that, but since the turn of the century, Hella has grown steadily, with new apartments being constructed every year. One of the best-known equine sports facilities in Iceland is located in Hella: Gaddstaðaflatir, also known as Rangárbakkar. The facilities include competition pitches for riding sports as well as an indoor riding arena. Five national meets have been held there, in 1986, 1994, 2004, 2008 and 2014, and the sixth is planned in 2021.
Efra-Hvolshellar caves
The caves in Efra-Hvol (Upper Hvol) have histarically been referred to as „the Irish Caves“ which are set into the so-called, „Irish Heath“. It was originally thought that many of these man-made or artificial caves were madein the 19th century, but in fact, their histofical names appear to confirm they originated even beforr the settlement period.   More geosites in the neighbourhood: www.katlageopark.com
Einbúi, Oddgeirshólar
A beautiful sports and outdoor recreational area on the banks of Hvítá River. The area is owned by the Youth Association Baldur.
Hafnarnes lighthouse and viewpoint
Hafnarnes is an area on the edge of the town Thorlákshöfn where you are surrounded by beautiful cliffs and the majestic ocean. A viewpoint is located in the area and from there you have panoramic views over the mountains surrounding the area such as the volcanoes Mt. Hekla and Eyjafjallajökull. This area is also very popular amongst surfers and usually you can spot a few surfing. There is a small lighthouse on the cliffs, it is not open for visitors but is very picturesque with the waves banging against the cliffs.  Hafnarnes lighthouse is part of the beatiful South Coast Lighthouse trail that you can find more information about here
Reynisfjara, Reynisfjall og Reynisdrangar
Reynisfjall is a 340 m high tuff mountain arising out of a volcanic eruption from under a glacier in the penultimate Ice Age, near the village of Vik.  Alternating in an irregular manner are layers of tuff, pillow lava and columnar basalt veins and loops.  Reynisdrangar stacks are a collection of 66 m high rock pillars that rise out of the sea and are of the same geological formation as Reynisfjall. On Reynisfjöru beach, very beautiful basalt formations in the south part of the mountain can be seen, and there you will find an exceedingly beautiful cave called Hálsanefshellir.  The waves here are deceiving and have caused the death of a number of visitors in recent years, even in the best of weather. Please take great care and keep a good distance from the sea.
Gullfoss waterfall
Gullfoss is actually two separate waterfalls, the upper one has a drop of 11 metres and the lower one 21 metres. The rock of the river bed was formed during an interglacial period. Water flows over Gullfoss at an average rate of 109 cubic metres per second. The heaviest floods have recorded a flow of 2000 cubic metres per second. During the summer the flow is 130 cubic metres per second, which would take only 3 seconds to fill this building. People were eager to exploit the power potential of Gullfoss and many plans for hydroelectric developments on the river Hvítá have been proposed. The trails by Gullfoss can be closed so it's good to chech the conditions before going. To check out whether it is open or closed to visitors check out the website of Safetravel.is.  
Geysir Geothermal area
One of the greatest natural attractions of Iceland and part of the famous "Golden Circle Tour", The Great Geysir, or Stori-Geysir, has been dormant since 1916 when it suddenly ceased to spout. It came to life only once in 1935, and as quickly went back to sleep. Since then its repose has sporadically been disturbed by the dumping of tons of carbolic soap powder into its seething orifice in order to tickle it to spout. It is not exactly known when Geysir was created. It is believed that it came into existence around the end of the 13th century when a series of strong earthquakes, accompanied by a devastating eruption of Mt. Hekla, hit Haukadalur, the geothermal valley where Geysir is located. What is known is that it spouted regularly every third hour or so up to the beginning of the 19th century and thereafter progressively at much longer intervals until it completely stopped in 1916. Whether its silence is eternal or temporary no one knows. When it was alive and shooting, it could thunderously blast a spectacular jet of superheated water and steam into the air as high as 60 to 80 meters according to different sources. Its opening is 18 meters wide and its chamber 20 meters deep. One reason for cessation is believed to be the accumulated rocks and foreign objects thrown into it by thousands of tourists throughout the years. Though definitely damaging, this however could not be the only reason for its dormancy. The Great Geysir was among the most notable geysers in the world, such as those in Yellowstone Park, New Zealand and North Iceland. The English word "geyser" is derived from the Icelandic word "geysir" which means gusher. Though the Great Geysir itself is now more or less inactive, the area surrounding it is geothermically very active with many smaller hot springs. The attraction of the area is now Strokkur (The Churn), another geyser 100 meters south of the Great Geysir, which erupts at regular intervals every 10 minutes or so and its white column of boiling water can reach as high as 30 meters. The whole area is a geothermal park sitting on top of a vast boiling cauldron. Belching sulphurous mud pots of unusual colors, hissing steam vents, hot and cold springs, warm streams, and primitive plants can all be found here. A short distance away to the west stands the small Laugarfjall Mountain with a panoramic view overlooking the Geysir area. King Christian IX of Denmark visited the area in 1874 and by the foot of the mountain are the rocks where he leaned while his hosts tried to impress and amuse him by boiling eggs in the hot springs. The rocks are now called Konungssteinar ("The King's Stones").
The Flói Bird Reserve
Northwest to the town of Eyrarbakki is a wetland area, rich in birdlife. The reserve has walking paths and a bird hide, an ideal spot for bird watching. The Flói Bird Reserve is listed in the Bird Life international Association. The Reserve is characterized by its flood meadows and numerous small ponds. Approximately 70 species of birds have been recorded in the Reserve. During spring and autumn migration Greylag Geese and White-fronted Geese can be found as well as Wigeon and Tufted Duck and various waders such as Snipe and passerines like Wheatear. During winter, birds, chiefly gulls and sometimes Long-tailed Duck and Common Eider, are concentrated in the estuary of the river Ölfusá. Whooper Swan, Teal, Mallard and Goosander are attracted to open water in winter.
Þjórsárdalsskógur Forest
The natural setting of the forest follows a varied landscape of intense contrasts, from flowering forests to unripe ash hake from Hekla. The forest is mostly birch, as well as spruce, pine and larch mixed forests. An ideal place for outdoor activities, as there is a number of marked and unmarked paths and forest roads in the forest. Þjórsárdalsskógur lies west of highway 32 where it goes east towards Búrfellsvirkjun. You can get into the forest from Ásólfsstaðir and also via a bridge over Sanda spölkorn in the valley. The camp site in Þjórsárdalur is in between and is well marked. In Þjórsárdalur, the forest stretches far up the slopes, the landscape is beautiful, varied and it has a true fairytale atmosphere. In the forest, there are numerous marked and unmarked paths and trails for travelers and hikers, rivers to swim in and lava to explore. In the area there are paths for wheelchairs, good camping and a swimming pool in Árnes about 15 kilometers down in the countryside. Source: skoraekt.is  
Haukafell
Haukafell is a forestry project that was launched in 1985 and now offers ample shelter to the low-lying, local vegetation, which mostly consists of berry-bushes that are ripe for picking in August. The area is situated east of Fláajökull glacier and is a popular outdoor area for the locals. There are various hiking trails to be enjoyed in the beautiful surroundings and the crispy fresh air. FromHaukafell you find a marked hiking trail to Fláajökull glacier, where you cross a recent walkway over the Kolgrafardalsá river. In Haukafell you find a good campsite in a beautiful area.   
Thingvallavatn Lake
Lake Thingvallavatn lies in a rift valley that extends south from the Langjokull glacier to mount Hengill, and from Botnssulur mountains in the west to Lyngdalsheidi heath in the east. The lake is the largest natural lake in Iceland, about 84 square kilometres, at an altitude of about 100 metres above sea level. The deepest part of the lake measures 114 metres, which means that it reaches below sea level.The catchment area of Lake Thingvallavatn, about 1300 square kilometres, lies in the same directions as the fissure in the area and its existence is closely connected with the geological history.The water in the lake is very cold and therefore very pure so snorkling and diving are popular in it. Silfra, one of the fissures in the northern part of the lake is one of the most popular diving spots in Iceland due to this.
Seljalandsfoss waterfall
A unique waterfall in the river Seljalandsá, about 30 km west from Skógar. It is 60 meters high with a foot path behind it at the bottom of the cliff, but with a thin cascade. It is the only known waterfall of its kind, where it is possible to walk behind it. The waterfall is very picturesque and therefore its photo can be found in many books and calendars. Access to the waterfall is from the farm of Seljaland along the Ring Road, Iceland's main highway. A little further to the west there are several other falls, among them the interesting Gljúfrabúi which is partially masked by its own canyon. Access to it is from Hamragarðar farm along the road, east of Markarfljót. Both of these “do-not-miss” attractions lie very close to the main Ring Road at the base of the Eyjafjallajökull Glacier, on the road leading in to Thorsmörk. During winter the area around Seljalandsfoss waterfall can be dangerous as paths can be slippery and large pieces of ice falling making it extremely dangerous to venture too close to the cliffs, and particularly dangerous to walk behind the waterfall. The fine mist from the waterfall freezes on the cliffs and the ceiling of the path behind the waterfall, but when the weather warms and the ice begins to thaw, it can fall of in large chunks which can be dangerous. People are advised to show caution and respect the closure of the paths. More information can be found on www.safetravel.is  
Timburhóll - Grove
Timburhóll is a beautiful grove where you can relax and enjoy the surroundings. You could even barbecue using the barbecue facilities provided but use caution with the fire and make sure not to leave any litter. This is also a memorial site of the great Icelandic artist and painter Ásgrímur Jónsson as well as the farmers Guðfinna Guðmundsdóttir and Stefán Jasonarson.
Raufarholshellir
There are many caves in the lava fields in Ölfus and the largest being Raufarhólshellir by road no. 39. A journey into Raufarhólshellir is a unique experience and a great opportunity to witness the inner workings of a volcanic eruption as one walks in the path of lava that flowed during the Leitahraun eruption, which occurred east of the Bláfjöll mountains about 5200 years ago. Daily tours are available in Raufarhólshellir.
Fossabrekkur
The uppermost falls in Ytri-Rangá river are called Fossabrekkur. The falls are just below the western source of the river just after entering the common land of the Landmannaafréttur. Fossabrekkur are a fertile oasis in the barren pumice landscape. It is necessary to drive to the location to see this gem, as it is well hidden. Fossabrekkur is a unique and beautiful location where the western arm of Ytri-Rangá fall off the rocks into the eastern arm and runs thereafter in a single channel almost all the way to the sea.
Knarrarósviti Lighthouse
Built-in 1938-1939, the lighthouse was the first one in Iceland to be built out of reinforced concrete. For a long time, the lighthouse was the tallest building in South Iceland, 26,2 meters (86 feet) high. It was designed by the engineer Axel Sveinsson as a blend of functionalism and art nouveau (jugendstil).  In summertime (mid of June to start August) the lighthouse is open every day. Knarrarósviti lighthouse is part of the beautiful South Coast Lighthouse trail that you can find more information about here. 
Gljúfrabúi
The waterfall Gljúfrabúi tumbles down from the Gljúfurá River. Its source is just north of Tröllagil (Troll Gorge) Canyon in the heath Hamragarðaheiði. It is a spring-fed river and less voluminous than its neighbour Seljalandsá River. The river runs from Tröllagilsmýri (Troll Gorge Marsh), a picturesque and fertile marsh in the heath. When the river emerges out of the marsh, it runs into the northern edge of a lava field which was formed in the volcanic eruptions in Eyjafjallajökull at the beginning of Holocene. There are several little waterfalls to be found in the river in the area. Gljúfrabúi, which is 40 m tall, is on the land of the uninhabited farmstead Hamragarðar which the Rangá Foresty Society received as a gift in 1962 and is now owned by the municipality of Rangárþing eystra. There is a certain mystique over the waterfall because it falls into a deep chasm, while in front of it there is much palagonite rock that blocks the waterfall so that only the very top of it is visible. The boulder that blocks the waterfall is called Franskanef. Previously, people believed that it and the surrounding cliffs were the residences of huldufólk or hidden people. It is possible to climb onto Franskanef and see the waterfall from above. On the most risky parts there is a chain with which it is possible to support oneself; however, care must be taken if one climbs up and it is not for everybody. It is also possible to take off your shoes and wade the river down in the canyon. It’s an amazing experience. Caution must be taken when travelling in the canyon because there is a risk of falling rocks. There is an old bath basin below Franskanef and at the inner end of the basin there is a little cave called Ömpuhellir, named after a hermit woman who lived there. Gljúfrabúi is a protected natural monument. A little south of Gljúfrabúi there is a small canyon in the cliff face from which it is possible to ascend onto the heath above where there is a spectacular view of the neighbouring area. People referred to it as going up Stígurinn (the Path) and thus the river in that canyon is named Stígslækur (Path Brook). The path is still rather clear, with some stairs where it is steepest. Right above the edge, there are ruins of old sheepcotes from Hamragarðar. 
Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon
Fjaðrárgljúfur is a magnificent and massive canyon, about 100 meters deep and about two kilometres long. The canyon has sheer walls, and is somewhat serpentine and narrow. The bedrock in Fjaðrárgljúfur is mostly palagonite from cold periods of the Ice Age and is thought to be about two million years old. The river Fjaðrá has its source in the mountain Geirlandshraun and falls off the heath edge in this stunning canyon until it makes it down into Skaftá river. Fjaðrá has changed a lot in the course of time. Today Fjaðrá is often rather low in water and therefore hikers can safely choose to walk inside the canyon. However, wading is necessary fairly often. Deep in the canyon there are waterfalls so one needs to walk the same way back. Most people choose to walk along a walking path up on the canyon’s edge while simultaneously enjoying the view above the canyon. The trail by Fjaðrárgljúfur Canyon can be closed so it's good to chech the conditions before going. To check out whether the canyon is open or closed to visitors check out the website of Safetravel.is. Those who plan on visiting the canyon need respect the rules and stay on the paths. Please help us to protect the fragile vegetation around the canyon! Formation of the Fjaðrárgljúfur canyon It is believed that Fjaðrárgljúfur formed at the end of the last Ice Age, about nine thousand years ago. When the glacier retreated, a lake formed in the valley behind a hard resistant rock. The run-off from the lake flowed to where Fjaðrárgljúfur is today. Glacial rivers from the glacier’s edge carried a lot of sediment into the lake and the river which ran from it dug itself down into the rock and down onto the palagonite in front of it. Because the cascade has been so large, it was powerful in digging out the canyon. Eventually the lake filled with sediments and the river’s strength dwindled. When the lake filled up completely, the river began to dig itself into the sediment layers which it had previously left in the valley. Fluvial terraces on both sides in the valley give an indication about the original height and location of the lake while a deep channel in the palagonite serves as a silent reminder to the power of nature.   More geosites in the neighbourhood: www.katlageopark.com
Hjálparfoss Waterfall
Hjalparfoss is a beautiful, two stepped waterfall near the confluence of Rivers Thjorsa and Fossa in the Thjorsa Valley. The surrounding area is called Hjalp (Help), because the travellers across the Sprengisandur Route found great help in reaching a vegetated area to graze their horses after a long journey in the barren interior. As elsewhere in the valley, the signs of the eruptions of Mt. Hekla are very prominent by the waterfall, ashes everywhere.