Travel search
Can't find it? Try searching for it :)

The Highlands

Álftavatn in Rangárvallaafréttur

There are lodges at Álftavatn, and Arctic char can be caught in the lake. Álftavatn is close to places of great natural beauty such as Grashagi, Torfafit, Ljósártungur, Jökultungur, Ófæruhöfði, Útigönguhöfði, Hvanngilshnausar, Torfatindur, Sáta, Brattháls and Hvanngil. The Álftavatn lodge area is part of Laugavegur, one of Iceland's most popular hiking trails, from Landmannalaugar to Þórsmörk.

Fishing in Landmannaafréttur

Many other lakes, apart from Veiðivötn, are located south of Tungnaá, and fishing permits for twelve of them can be bought from the wardens at Landmannahellir.

These are the lakes Blautuver, Dómadalsvatn, Eskihlíðarvatn, Frostastaðavatn, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Hnausapollur (Bláhylur), Hrafnabjargavatn, Kílingavötn, Lifrafjallavatn, Ljótipollur, Löðmundarvatn and Sauðleysuvatn. Ljótipollur and Hnausapollur are the youngest of these lakes, with the former dating from 1477 and the latter from 871.

Most of these are closed lakes, although Helliskvísl flows out from Löðmundarvatn, and Blautuver and Klingavötn are connected to Tungnaá. Only trout is caught in Ljótapollur, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Lifrarfjallavatn and Dómadalsvatn. Trout and Arctic char is caught in Blautuver, Frostastaðavatn and Kílingavötn, but only Arctic char in other lakes.

Frostastadavatn

Lake Frostastadavatn rests in breathtaking nature and is surrounded by black lava fields and colourful rhyolite mountains. It covers around 2,5km2 and lies at 573 meters above sea level. Access to the lake is very good, road are both on its north and east sides.

Like other lakes in this area it is rich of trout and therefore popular by fishingmen as well as hikers who wants fresh catch of the day on their dish at dinner time.

Hrafntinnusker

Hrafntinnusker in Torfajökull glacier is place you have to look at. The English name of this 1128 m high mountain is The Obsidian Skerry. It is situated some distance east of the infamous volcano Hekla. It is accessible by 4wd vehicles from the north and south

Hungurfit in Rangárvallaafréttur

There have been lodge facilities in Hungurfit since 1963, when a mountain lodge, housing 20 people, was built there. This was a great improvement for mountain shepherds, who previously had to sleep in tents. In 2013, a new mountain lodge was opened in Hungurfit, housing 50 people. It is one of the most modern mountain lodges in Iceland, with running water, a flushable toilet and electricity.

Hungurfit has unique natural beauty, and the area is suitable for hiking, jeeping and horse riding. There are excellent horse riding trails leading from the area, both to Rangárbotnar, Sultarfit, Faxi and onto Hvanngil and down to Fljótshlíðarafrétt. It is a day's journey by horse from Hungurfit to Foss at Rangárvellir. The river Hvítmaga has its source at Hungurfit, and it is highly enjoyable to travel by horse or foot along the river.

Above the mountain lodges, the Skyggnishlíðar ridge leads up to the mountain Skyggnir. Skyggnishlíðar is a popular hiking destination, as the view from there is spectacular on a clear day. It is also highly enjoyable to walk or ride to Sultuarfit and towards Gimbragil and Hrútagil or into Jökulskarð.

Hvanngil in Rangárvallaafréttur

Hvanngil is an established lodge area in Rangárvallaafréttur, where mountain shepherds have stayed for decades. The name of the area is derived from the ravine that leads to Hvanngilsbotn, bordered to the east by Hvanngilshnausar and by Ófæra and Ófæruhöfði to the west. An old stone-built dwelling spot, where mountain shepherds took refuge when gathering sheep, can also be found there. The newest lodge in Hvanngil dates from the early 1990s and houses 60 people. The old lodge, which is also a horse stable, can house 20 people on mattresses. It was built in 1964 and was considered highly luxurious in those days. There are also remains of an older hut, which was mainly used when the weather was too bad to sleep in tents. There is also a campsite, toilets and showers at the site.

There are short walking trails from Hvanngil to Hvanngilskrókur and Hvanngilshnausar, and it is also enjoyable to walk into Hvanngil. From Hvanngil, longer walking trails lead to Mælifellssandur at Strútur, past Slysaalda at Mælifellssandur, where four Skaftafell residents died of exposure in 1868, or through Kaldaklof and from there past Gimbragil, Hrútagil and across Strútsöldur to Strútskofi, down Emstrur on the Laugavegur to Þórsmörk, across Rangárvallaafréttur to Krókur and Hungurfit. One can also continue along Laugavegur to Hrafntinnusker and from there to Landmannalaugar.

Kerlingarfjöll Mountains

The mountain massif Kerlingarfjöll (The Giantess Mountains; 800 - 1500 m) is the main ornament in the chain of mountains and glaciers framing the Kjölur area. It covers about 150 km² area southeast of The Temple Glacier (Hofsjökull) It derives its name from a single, 25 m high and dark hyaloclastite pillar protruding from the light colored, rhyolite scree of the peak Kerlingartindur. The aforementioned types of rock represent the main structure of the mountain massif and this yellowish tint is the dominant color in the area.
The area is full of small steaming hot springs, mudpools and water fountains. It is truly a hikers paradise. It is one of the largest geothermal areas in all of Europe and there are future plans to construct a large geothermal steam plant here for electricity to harness the massive amounts of energy stored here. The area is very unique, sensitive and beautiful - why such a decision may be controversial if proper conservational steps are not taken when doing so.
It is recommended to use 4wd vehicles because of the various and changing condition of the tracks and unbridged rivers, which have to be forded with the greatest of care. It is also recommended that people read the special brochure on driving in the interior before heading up there and remember, that off road driving is strictly forbidden. Many of those who have visited the interior catch the bug and the only remedy is to come back again and again. It is like an incurable disease. Travelling across the interior was common during the Saga period, but after that up to the middle of the 18th century, superstition kept people away. Nowadays - more and more people enjoy this part of the country the whole year round.
The small glacier patches up there have been retreating fast and now the summer skiing school, which was operated for decades, exists no more. Its complex of houses is now being used to accommodate travelers in the area during the summer months.

The small glacier patches up there have been retreating fast and now the summer skiing school, which was operated for decades, exists no more. Its complex of houses is now being used to accommodate travelers in the area during the summer months.

Lakagigar and Laki

Lakagígar is a row of craters, formed in one of the world's largest mixed eruptions in recorded history. This continuous series of eruptions emitted a vast quantity of lava and substantial amounts of volcanic ash from a fissure stretching 25 km across the area west of the ice cap. The craters are regarded as a globally unique phenomenon and are as such a protected natural monument.

In 1783, a huge lava flow streamed from Lakagígar in what became known as the "Skaftá Fires." This is believed to have been one of the greatest lava flows in a single eruption in the history of the world: the molten lava filled the gorges through which the Skaftá and Hverfisfljót rivers flowed, and swept down in two branches into inhabited areas, to spread over the lowlands where it laid waste many farms. The eruption produced large quantities of volcanic ash. For residents of the region, and Iceland as a whole, the results of the eruption were catastrophic: this time is known as "Móðuharðindin" (the Haze Famine).

Landmannahellir

Landmannahellir in Landmannaafréttur has long been a destination point for travellers passing through the area. The name of the place is drawn from a cave there which was used for centuries to shelter both men and horses.

At present, the location is a popular stopping point for both hikers and riders who stay there during the summer. There is, moreover, a campsite at the location. The operation of the area is in the hands of Hellismenn ehf. The company owns a number of huts at the location, as do Veiðifélag Landmannaafréttar and private entities.

A well-known hiking trail, Hellismannaleið, lies through the area and has now been signposted from Rjúpnavellir through Áfangagil to Landmannahellir and from there to Landmannalaugar. In order to reach Landmannahellir cave, one needs to use the Dómadalsleið (road F225). The road is approximately 80 km long from Landvegamót to Landmannahellir.

Landmannalaugar - Nature Reserve

Landmannalaugar derives its name from a hot pool that rises from under the Laugahraun lava field. Landmannalaugar has been a stopping point for people for centuries, and the mountain shepherds on Landmannaafréttur have stayed there while herding sheep off the mountain for as long as there have been reports of such travel.

Many beautiful mountains can be seen from Landmannalaugar: Barmur, Bláhnúkur, Brennisteinsalda, Suðurnám and Norðurnám. There are considerable deposits of rhyolite, obsidian and rhyolite lava in the area, and the Landmannalaugar landscape is famous for its colourfulness and unique environs.

The start of one of the most popular hiking trails in Iceland, Laugavegurinn, is at Landmannalaugar. The trail proceeds along Hrafntinnusker, Álftavatn, Hvanngil, Emstrur and ends in Þórsmörk.

Ferðafélag Íslands (the Iceland Touring Association) provides facilities, such as showers and accommodation, for travellers at Landmannalaugar. In addition, there is a horse rental and a small café operated during the summer.

Mountain Hekla - Volcano

The volcano Mt. Hekla is Iceland's most famous volcano and the one that has erupted most frequently in recent years. Mt. Hekla rises 1,491 m over sea level and can widely be seen in the south of Iceland. Hekla has been dubbed the Queen of Icelandic Volcanos and is well known internationally.

Considerable superstitions have been attached to the mountain, with the most famous legend being that it is the entrance to Hell and might even be Hell itself. The first documented expedition onto the mountain is from 1750 when the naturalists Eggert Ólaffson and Bjarni Pálsson scaled the mountain. The route to the top of Hekla is quite popular, although hikers must be aware of the danger that can occur if the mountain should erupt. The route taken normally starts from Skjólkvíar.

Hekla is located in an area where the South Iceland fracture zone meets the South Iceland volcanic zone, which probably accounts for its frequent eruptions. Hekla has erupted in the following years since Iceland was settled: 1104, 1158, 1206, 1222, 1300, 1341, 1389, 1501, 1597, 1636, 1693, 1766, 1845, 1947, 1970, 1980, 1981, 1991 and 2000. Geologists have repeatedly reiterated in recent years that Hekla is ready to erupt and can erupt at any time. However, the mountain does generally provide an hour's warning.

Thorsmork

The Fjallabak Nature Reserve, Peaceland between the mountains
The pearl of the central highlands, Landmannalaugar, and its surroundings are too colorful and magnificent to describe with words.

South Iceland

Towns & Villages

The south of Iceland has several towns and villages, each with its own style, charm and points of interest. Selfoss is the largest town and has a variety of shops, services, many restaurants and fast food places. Most towns are close to the main route, making them accessible and enjoyable.

Explore map by categories

Map Höfn Kirkjubæjarklaustur Vík Vestmannaeyjar Hvolsvöllur Flúðir Laugarvatn Reykholt Laugarás Borg Brautarholt Hveragerði Árnes Selfoss Hella Stokkseyri Eyrarbakki Þykkvibær Þórlákshöfn