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Hólaskjól

Hólaskjól is located on the highland route, Fjallabaksleið Nyrðri, about 35 km. from the main # 1 road. You pass through the Skaftártunga area, road # 208, onto the Fjallabaksleið Nyrðri, road # F208. This is a coarse gravel road, but in summer it is passable by all types of vehicles. There are no unbridged rivers on the way.
From Hólaskjól it is about 6 km. to the Eldgjá canyon. Shortly before you reach Eldgjá there is a small unbridged river, that quite often can only be forded by 4X4 vehicles.
Hólaskjól is located at the foot of Lambaskarðshólar hills, at the edge of a lavafield originating from an eruption in Eldgjá during the years 934-940. Hólaskjól is in a peaceful, sheltered area with beautiful surroundings. Only a 5 minute walk away is a very impressive waterfall in the river Syðri Ófæra. It resembles a smaller version of the well known Gullfoss, or Golden Falls and is therefore often called Little Gullfoss or Silver Falls.
At Hólaskjól there is a main lodge on two floors, with sleeping bag accommodations in bunks for 71 persons. There are WC´s and showers on both floors and also cooking facilities with gas stoves and utensils for cooking and eating.
There are also a few huts that is possible to rent with or without bed linen. The huts have gas stoves, utensils for cooking and eating, WC and cold running water.
There is good space available for tents and campers.
The camp site has tables and chairs, toilets and showers. I

Rates for camp site 2017:

Adults: 1.600 kr
Children 6-12 years: 470 kr

Hólaskjól

Flaga

GPS Points N63° 54' 26.639" W18° 36' 16.217"
Accommodation 89 Sleeping bags
Opening period 01/06 - 30/09
Service Sleeping bag acc. Camping ground Cooking facilities Shower

Travel directory for Hólaskjól

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Nature
9.25 km
Ofaerufoss - Nyrdri Ofaera river

Ófærufoss is an extremely beautiful waterfall in the river Nyrðri-Ófæra and falls into Eldgjá in two cascades. There used to be a stone arch across the lower one up until the year 1993, when it fell into the river during spring thawing. From Northern Fjallabaksleið it is possible to drive into Eldgjá and walk from there to the Ófærufoss. A road lies up to the eastern edge of Eldgjá. To get there, one needs to cross the river Nyrðri-Ófæra at a wading place, which can be risky. It is safe to recommend a walk up the mountain Gjátindur, from where there is magnificent view of Eldgjá, mountains by Langisjór and Lakagígur and its surroundings.

Ófærufoss falls into Eldgjá in Skaftártunguafréttur. Eldgjá is an approx. 40 km long eruptive fissure, approx. 600 meters wide in many places, and up to 200 meters deep. When it was formed, probably around 934, there were likely eruptions along the whole extent of it. The fissure is believed to reach under Mýrdalsjökull glacier. From Eldgjá, extensive streams of lava have flowed through Landbrot and Meðalland, reaching sea at Alviðruhamrar in Álftaver. The lava-field is believed to cover 700 km², which makes it one of the vastest lava-fields on earth in historical times, that is, after the last ice age.

Eldgjá is believed to belong to the same crater system as Katla. Eldgjá is a unique natural phenomenon and is listed as natural remnants. Plans to make Eldgjá and its surrounding area a part of Vatnajökull National Park are in place.
Theories have surfaced that suggest that the Eldgjá eruptions had even more effect in Europe then the Lakagígar eruptions. According to newly discovered evidence, crop failure, plagues and other disasters occurred in both Europe and the Middle East at that time. It has also been speculated that these eruptions caused more damage than the eruptions of Lakagígar.

Nature
11.41 km
Eldgja canyon

Between Kirkjubæjarklaustur and Landmannalaugar, the eruptive fissure Eldgjá is to be found. Eldgjá is a 40 km long eruptive fissure, 600 meters wide in many places, and up to 200 meters deep, formed in a gigantic eruption in 934. From Eldgjá, extensive streams of lava have flowed through Landbrot and Meðalland, reaching sea at Alviðruhamrar in Álftaver. The lava-field is believed to cover 700 km², which makes it one of the vastest lava-fields on earth since the last ice age. Eldgjá is believed to belong to the same crater system as Katla. Eldgjá is a unique natural phenomenon and is listed as natural remnants.

South Iceland

Towns & Villages

The south of Iceland has several towns and villages, each with its own style, charm and points of interest. Selfoss is the largest town and has a variety of shops, services, many restaurants and fast food places. Most towns are close to the main route, making them accessible and enjoyable.

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Map Höfn Kirkjubæjarklaustur Vík Vestmannaeyjar Hvolsvöllur Flúðir Laugarvatn Reykholt Laugarás Borg Brautarholt Hveragerði Árnes Selfoss Hella Stokkseyri Eyrarbakki Þykkvibær Þórlákshöfn