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EyjaTours

Experience Westman Islands in more PERSONAL and PRIVATE way with Eyjatours.

We offer Puffin tours around the island, private tours and custom made tours. Our goal is to make your trip magical and memorable so you will never forget this amazing Island. Eyjatours is fully licensed, local family tour operator here in Westman Islands. We are committed to provide excellent and personal service for travellers who want to enjoy and discover Westman Islands in more personal and private way. Our tours are guided by local guide with expert knowledge, personal attention and many years of experience.

EyjaTours

Básaskersbryggja

GPS Points N0° 0' 0.000" W0° 0' 0.000"
Telephone

+354 852-6939

Opening period All year
Service Open year round Credit cards accepted

Travel directory for EyjaTours

The official travel index of Iceland

Others

Álftröð Guesthouse
Guesthouses
  • 566-6246
Hotel Selja
Hotels
  • Dímonarvegur (vegur/road 250)
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
Raudholl
Bed & Breakfast
  • Rauðhóll
  • 851 Hella
  • 844-8538
Bryggjur
Cottages
  • Skíðabakki 1
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
Hrafnagil
Cottages
  • Hrafnagil
  • 816 Ölfus
  • 866-9772
Syðri Kvíhólmi
Cottages
  • Syðri Kvíhólmi
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
  • 868-278
The Potato Storage
Apartments
  • Langatorfa, Svínafell
  • 785 Öræfi
  • 789-0785, 895-1917, 824-8903
Klettholt
Cottages
  • Klettholt
  • 801 Selfoss
  • 892-1340, 499-2540
Umi Hotel
Hotels
  • Leirnavegur nr. 243
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
  • 518-4001
Cottage in Reykjaskogur
Cottages
  • Reykjaskógur
  • 801 Selfoss
  • 892-0652, 89-20654
Skogar Apartment
Apartments
  • Kennarabústað 2
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
Nature
Fishing in Landmannaafréttur

Many other lakes, apart from Veiðivötn, are located south of Tungnaá, and fishing permits for twelve of them can be bought from the wardens at Landmannahellir.

These are the lakes Blautuver, Dómadalsvatn, Eskihlíðarvatn, Frostastaðavatn, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Hnausapollur (Bláhylur), Hrafnabjargavatn, Kílingavötn, Lifrafjallavatn, Ljótipollur, Löðmundarvatn and Sauðleysuvatn. Ljótipollur and Hnausapollur are the youngest of these lakes, with the former dating from 1477 and the latter from 871.

Most of these are closed lakes, although Helliskvísl flows out from Löðmundarvatn, and Blautuver and Klingavötn are connected to Tungnaá. Only trout is caught in Ljótapollur, Herbjarnarfellsvatn, Lifrarfjallavatn and Dómadalsvatn. Trout and Arctic char is caught in Blautuver, Frostastaðavatn and Kílingavötn, but only Arctic char in other lakes.

Wild Life
Birds of South Iceland

Birds of South Iceland is a program offering excellent year-round services for birdwatchers. South Iceland has a great deal to offer visiting birdwatchers with its wide variety of habitats, including wetlands, seabird colonies, highland oases and unique coastlines. The largest colonies of puffins, pink-footed geesese and great skuas in the world are located within this region, together with Europe's largest leach's storm-petrel colony. South Iceland has a wide range of accommodation from camp sites to 4-star hotels and some within a short driving distance from Reykjavik.

Hornafjörður and Skarðsfjörður are shallow fjords or coastal lagoons on either side of the village of Höfn. The area is home to large numbers of birds all year around. Not only is it an important staging area on migration, but breeding birds are well represented in spring and summer and it is also the region's main wintering area for birds. A rich mosaic of wetlands stretches from Höfn all the way west to the glacial sands of Breiðamerkursandur.

The bird life of the great glacial sands of the south coast has a character all of its own. It is the kingdom of the great skua and is home to the largest colony of this charismatic species on Earth. Wherever there is sufficient water, vegetation sprouts up and attracts a range of birds. The spectacular Skaftafell in Vatnajökull National Park contains woodlands and a variety of species.

The areas Landbrot and Meðal-land support a wide range of birds. The region's wetlands are varied and include flood-meadows, lakes, springs, streams and lava fields. Breeding birds include horned grebe and various ducks. The freshwater springs attract numerous birds in the winter and form important wintering grounds for barrow's goldeneye, common goldeneye and goosander. White-fronted geese are common visitors on spring and autumn passage. Great skuas are conspicuous on the glacial sands.

The valley of Mýrdalur is a rich birding area, with Reynisfjall, Reynisdrangar and Dyrhólaey the chief birding sites. Puffins breed on the cliffs at Víkurhamrar above the village of Vík (the furthest colony from the sea in the world), on Reynisfjall mountain and the headland Dyrhólaey, while common guillemot and razor-bill breed at the sea stacks Reynisdrangar and at Dyrhólaey. There is a huge arctic tern colony at Vík and a smaller one at Dyrhólaey.

Þjórsárver to the south of the glacier Hofsjökull is the most expansive oasis in the central highlands. It is an area of spectacular scenery, with rich swathes of vegetation alternating with barren sands and glaciers. The area represents very important breeding and moulting grounds for pink-footed geese. Other breeders include the great northern diver, the whooper swan, the long-tailed duck, the purple sandpiper, the red-necked phalarope, the arctic tern and the snow bunting. Part of Þjórsárver is protected and a Ramsar site.

Another key birding location in the highlands is the chain of lakes called Veiðivötn. This beautiful and unusual landscape has been shaped by repeated volcanic activity and most of the lakes are located in craters. Great northern divers are particularly common, and other breeding birds include the whooper swan, the pink-footed goose, the scaup, the long-tailed duck, the harlequin duck, the ringed plover, the purple sandpiper, the arctic tern and the

snow bunting. Barrow's goldeneye winters here and has recently bred.

Lakes, ponds and marshes can be found across the lowland areas of Landeyjar and Rangarárvellir. Some of the best birding sites are the lake Skúmsstaðavatn and surroundings, Oddaflóð (protected) and lake Lambhagavatn. Large numbers of wildfowl and waders breed in the area and pass through in the spring and autumn.

Two of the larger lakes in the area, Apavatn and Laugarvatn, along with adjoining wetlands and rivers, are among the best sites for ducks in south Iceland. Barrow's goldeneye, common goldeneye and goosander winter here. Harlequin ducks breed locally and hundreds of scaup, tufted duck and red-breasted merganser stop off on passage and are also common breeders.

Sogið, the river which flows out of lake Þingvallavatn, is one of Iceland's best locations for winter ducks. It is home to the largest flock of barrow's goldeneye outside Mývatn and is the main winter site for the common goldeneye in Iceland. Goosander, red-breasted merganser and tufted duck are common. White-tailed eagles are often seen in winter and harlequin ducks move up the river in spring. Lake Þingvallavatn itself is known for its breeding great northern divers.

The coastline between the mouths of the great glacial rivers Ölfusá and Þjórsá is the largest lava shoreline in Iceland and forms the southern end of the vast Þjórsárhraun lava field which flowed 8,000 years ago and is the largest post ice age lava flow on Earth. Inland there are myriad lakes and ponds. The area hosts an array of birds all year and it is of particular importance for migrants such as knot, dunlin, sanderling, turnstone, brent goose, Eurasian wigeon and various other ducks.

On either side of the estuary of the river Ölfusá there are two large wetlands: BirdLife Iceland's reserve at Flói on the east bank, and Ölfusforir on the west bank. Both are large expanses of pools and lakes which attract numerous birds in the breeding season and on passage alike. The red-throated diver is the characteristic bird of the Flói reserve and dunlin and black-tailed godwit are particularly common here. Ölfusforir is an excellent birding location in winter, attracting large flocks of teal, mallard and goosander, as well as Iceland's largest concentration of the grey heron.

The Westman archipelago has over million pairs of seabirds within stunning landscapes. Here is the world's center of Atlantic Puffins with over 800 thousand breeding pairs. Three nocturnal tubenose species breed in the Westmans, which has virually all the the Icelandic populations. Here is the largest Leach's Storm-Petrel colony in E-Atlantic (around 200.000 pairs), and a large European Storm-Petrel colony as well. Few thousand Manx Shearwaters pairs breed here also. About 50.000 pairs of Northern Fulmars breed also. Kittiwake, Common and Black Gullemots are widespread and common. Some 10.000 Northern Gannet paris breed in four spectacular colonies residing in the southern islands. Many other seabird species breed in lesser numbers or are seen on the sea.

www.facebook.com/birdsofsouthiceland

Nature
Nupsstadur Forrest

The forest Núpsstaðarskógar is on the land of Núpsstaðir, but Núpsstaðir is the easternmost farm in Skaftárhreppur and is situated by Lómagnúpur. At Núpsstaður there are remarkable old turf buildings that are believed to be typical for farms in Iceland in past centuries. The most noteworthy of these is the chapel, one of few remaining turf churches in the country. The beauty of the environment surrounding Núpsstaður is well known. The area reaches from the ocean and black sands and all the way to Vatnajökull. Volcanic eruptions, glaciers and lakes have shaped the environment there, in addition to shaping diverse formations.
The forest Núpsstaðarskógar is a beautiful copsewood that grows in the hills of Eystrafjall, west of Skeiðarárjökull and south of Grænalón. Diverse vegetation grows there and it's an area that's enjoyable to walk around. A rough track to the forest passes Lómagnúpur and Núpsvötn. There is lots to see there and the landscape is grand, sure to embed itself in the mind of anyone who goes there. Wild sheep were there in the 19th century.

The forest Núpsstaðarskógar is a beautiful copsewood that grows in the hills of Eystrafjall, west of Skeiðarárjökull and south of Grænalón. Diverse vegetation grows there and it's an area that's enjoyable to walk around. A rough track to the forest passes Lómagnúpur and Núpsvötn. There is lots to see there and the landscape is grand, sure to embed itself in the mind of anyone who goes there. Wild sheep were there in the 19th century.

South Iceland

Towns & Villages

The south of Iceland has several towns and villages, each with its own style, charm and points of interest. Selfoss is the largest town and has a variety of shops, services, many restaurants and fast food places. Most towns are close to the main route, making them accessible and enjoyable.

Explore map by categories

Map Höfn Kirkjubæjarklaustur Vík Vestmannaeyjar Hvolsvöllur Flúðir Laugarvatn Reykholt Laugarás Borg Brautarholt Hveragerði Árnes Selfoss Hella Stokkseyri Eyrarbakki Þykkvibær Þórlákshöfn