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Umi Hotel

UMI hotel is located by one of the most beautiful mountain range in the country. The hotel is only about 150 km away from Reykjavik and 2 km of the Ring road (Road NR. 1). Our location offers a strong connection to nature that allows our guests to experience the peace and quiet of the Icelandic countryside.

The hotel offers a first class restaurant with a unique view of the Westman Islands and the southern coastline, as well as a lounge bar with a view of the famous subglacial volcano Eyjafjallajökull and the beautiful mountain terrain surrounding it. Next to our hotel the river Svaðbælisá peacefully flows by. The starlit skies and northern lights certainly won't let anyone down over the winter months.

Umi Hotel

Leirnavegur nr. 243

GPS Points N63° 31' 8.278" W19° 38' 27.269"
Telephone

+354 5184001

Opening period All year

Travel directory for Umi Hotel

The official travel index of Iceland

History and Culture
5.87 km
Rútshellir

Rútshellir in mount Hrútafell is a protected cave with a newly renovated sheep pen attached in front of it. Said to be the largest man-made cave in Iceland, Rútshellir has two parts. The upper half contains an adjoining cave, which is so high that at one time a 2nd floor was installed making this a double storey cave. Further in, there is a ledge that was undoubtedly used for sleeping. In the ceiling you will notice a carving of a cross which tells us that the cave dates from the time of Irish monks, before the Norse settlement. Many legends are connected to this cave. One involves a man called Rútur who lived in the cave but his slaves intended to kill him. They carved a hole under the ledge where Rútur slept, so they could kill him with spears while he was sleeping. One night on arriving home and preparing to sleep, Rútur discovered their plot. He chased the slaves into the mountains and killed them all.

Nature
19.61 km
Sólheimajökull

Sólheimajökull is an outlet glacier that descends from the southwest corner of Mýrdalsjökull. It is a so called "climate glacier" as it responds rather quickly to climate changes. Access to the glacier tongue is good because it reaches down to the lowlands and possible to go hiking on the glaciers with tour operators from the parking lot.

Nature
7.02 km
Dragnurinn í Drangshlíð

Drangurinn í Drangshlíð is a characteristic tuff rock formation that stands alone on the grazing land of Drangshlíð farm, at the foothills of Eyjafjöll. A folktale tells of a strong man named Grettir Ásmundsson who was showing off and ripped the giant boulder right out of Hrútafell cliff, leaving a chasm which is now above Skarðshlíð. In these rocks there are caves and passages to which additional buildings have been added throughout the centuries, some of which are still standing. The site has been used in the filming of Icelandic movies and in various documentaries. Drangurinn, and its immediate surroundings, is a protected natural site and is on private land.

Nature
24.19 km
Gljúfrabúi

The waterfall Gljúfrabúi tumbles down from the Gljúfurá River. Its source is just north of Tröllagil (Troll Gorge) Canyon in the heath Hamragarðaheiði. It is a spring-fed river and less voluminous than its neighbour Seljalandsá River. The river runs from Tröllagilsmýri (Troll Gorge Marsh), a picturesque and fertile marsh in the heath. When the river emerges out of the marsh, it runs into the northern edge of a lava field which was formed in the volcanic eruptions in Eyjafjallajökull at the beginning of Holocene. There are several little waterfalls to be found in the river in the area.

Gljúfrabúi, which is 40 m tall, is on the land of the uninhabited farmstead Hamragarðar which the Rangá Foresty Society received as a gift in 1962 and is now owned by the municipality of Rangárþing eystra. There is a certain mystique over the waterfall because it falls into a deep chasm, while in front of it there is much palagonite rock that blocks the waterfall so that only the very top of it is visible. The boulder that blocks the waterfall is called Franskanef. Previously, people believed that it and the surrounding cliffs were the residences of huldufólk or hidden people. It is possible to climb onto Franskanef and see the waterfall from above. On the most risky parts there is a chain with which it is possible to support oneself; however, care must be taken if one climbs up and it is not for everybody. It is also possible to take off your shoes and wade the river down in the canyon. It's an amazing experience. Caution must be taken when travelling in the canyon because there is a risk of falling rocks. There is an old bath basin below Franskanef and at the inner end of the basin there is a little cave called Ömpuhellir, named after a hermit woman who lived there. Gljúfrabúi is a protected natural monument.

A little south of Gljúfrabúi there is a small canyon in the cliff face from which it is possible to ascend onto the heath above where there is a spectacular view of the neighbouring area. People referred to it as going up Stígurinn (the Path) and thus the river in that canyon is named Stígslækur (Path Brook). The path is still rather clear, with some stairs where it is steepest. Right above the edge, there are ruins of old sheepcotes from Hamragarðar.

South Iceland

Towns & Villages

The south of Iceland has several towns and villages, each with its own style, charm and points of interest. Selfoss is the largest town and has a variety of shops, services, many restaurants and fast food places. Most towns are close to the main route, making them accessible and enjoyable.

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Map Höfn Kirkjubæjarklaustur Vík Vestmannaeyjar Hvolsvöllur Flúðir Laugarvatn Reykholt Laugarás Borg Brautarholt Hveragerði Árnes Selfoss Hella Stokkseyri Eyrarbakki Þykkvibær Þórlákshöfn