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Hotel Geysir

The trademark of Iceland, the great Geysir, gave the hotel its name and Geysir is situated right outside the front door of the hotel. Haukadalur is one of Iceland's most famous historical sites, both ancient and today. The farmer's son from Haukadalur, Sigurdur Greipsson, founded a sports school in his father's inheritance at Haukadalur, which he operated with his wife Sigrun Bjarnadóttir for a period of forty-three years.
The Geysir-Center, which is directly opposite the geothermal area of Geysir and Strokkur, consists of a whole building complex with elegant restaurants, hotel, hot spring swimming pool, souvenir shop, outdoor clothing store, snack shop, Geysir museum with multimedia show and earthquake simulator, horse rental, golf course and camping area. Also there are glacier tours on Langjökull glacier and many other activities such as highland tours. Therefore it is perfect for day trips because of many different possibilities of entertainment. Further details of activities in the region is available at the hotel's website.
Hotel Geysir

Geysir

GPS Points N64° 18' 34.451" W20° 18' 6.450"
Telephone

480-6800

Fax

480-6801

Accommodation 36 Rooms / 70 Beds / 24 Houses
Opening period All year
Service Open year round Horse riding Conference facilities Member of SAF, The Icelandic Travel Association Smoking not allowed Public lavatory Place of interest Bird watching Hotel / guesthouse Petrole station Restaurant Swimming pool Fishing permits Internet access Hot pot Golf course Snowmobile rental Credit cards accepted Bar

Travel directory for Hotel Geysir

The official travel index of Iceland

Others

Betula
Tour Operators
  • Daltún 801 Selfoss
  • 801 Selfoss
  • 482-2008, 696-6764
Dalbúi Golf Club
Golf Courses
  • Miðdalur
  • 840 Laugarvatn
  • 893-0200, 893-0210
Geysir Golf Club
Golf Courses
  • Haukadalur
  • 801 Selfoss
  • 486-8733
Við Faxa
Tour Operators
  • Heiði
  • 801 Selfoss
  • 774-7440
Nature
9.92 km
Gullfoss waterfall

Gullfoss is actually two separate waterfalls, the upper one has a drop of 11 metres and the lower one 21 metres. The rock of the river bed was formed during an interglacial period.

Water flows over Gullfoss at an average rate of 109 cubic metres per second. The heaviest floods have recorded a flow of 2000 cubic metres per second. During the summer the flow is 130 cubic metres per second, which would take only 3 seconds to fill this building. People were eager to exploit the power potential of Gullfoss and many plans for hydroelectric developments on the river Hvítá have been proposed.

Nature
Nature
9.63 km
Bruarhlod

Bruarhlod (Brúarhlöð) is a narrow gorge in Hvitá River about three kilometers south of the Golden Waterfalls (Gullfoss). Through the centuries the river has formed the rocks in to beautiful pillars and formations. The name of the rocks is Breccias (Hyaloclastite).

Just above Bruarhlod is a bridge over the river, which was built 1959 after the first two bridges washed away, the first one in 1929, and the second one in 1930. When driving over the bridge we can only imagine the forces needed to wash away a bridge in that size.

Hvita River is a popular place for river rafting and to raft through Bruarhlod is adventure that is difficult to describe with words. Travelers should make a note to stop at Bruarhlod, view the magnificent nature and the rock formations.

Nature
0.52 km
The Great Geysir
One of the greatest natural attractions of Iceland and part of the famous "Golden Circle Tour", The Great Geysir, or Stori-Geysir, has been dormant since 1916 when it suddenly ceased to spout. It came to life only once in 1935, and as quickly went back to sleep. Since then its repose has sporadically been disturbed by the dumping of tons of carbolic soap powder into its seething orifice in order to tickle it to spout. It is not exactly known when Geysir was created. It is believed that it came into existence around the end of the 13th century when a series of strong earthquakes, accompanied by a devastating eruption of Mt. Hekla, hit Haukadalur, the geothermal valley where Geysir is located. What is known is that it spouted regularly every third hour or so up to the beginning of the 19th century and thereafter progressively at much longer intervals until it completely stopped in 1916. Whether its silence is eternal or temporary no one knows. When it was alive and shooting, it could thunderously blast a spectacular jet of superheated water and steam into the air as high as 60 to 80 meters according to different sources. Its opening is 18 meters wide and its chamber 20 meters deep. One reason for cessation is believed to be the accumulated rocks and foreign objects thrown into it by thousands of tourists throughout the years. Though definitely damaging, this however could not be the only reason for its dormancy. The Great Geysir was among the most notable geysers in the world, such as those in Yellowstone Park, New Zealand and North Iceland. The English word "geyser" is derived from the Icelandic word "geysir" which means gusher. Though the Great Geysir itself is now more or less inactive, the area surrounding it is geothermically very active with many smaller hot springs. The attraction of the area is now Strokkur (The Churn), another geyser 100 meters south of the Great Geysir, which erupts at regular intervals every 10 minutes or so and its white column of boiling water can reach as high as 30 meters. The whole area is a geothermal park sitting on top of a vast boiling cauldron. Belching sulphurous mud pots of unusual colors, hissing steam vents, hot and cold springs, warm streams, and primitive plants can all be found here. A short distance away to the west stands the small Laugarfjall Mountain with a panoramic view overlooking the Geysir area. King Christian IX of Denmark visited the area in 1874 and by the foot of the mountain are the rocks where he leaned while his hosts tried to impress and amuse him by boiling eggs in the hot springs. The rocks are now called Konungssteinar ("The King's Stones").
History and Culture
0.33 km
Geysir Centre

Geysir multimedia show
What does a volcanic eruption look like? What's the fascination with the northern lights all about? What do you imagine an ice cave to be like? Can you feel an earthquake without having the earth actually shake?
The answers to these and other questions are found at Geysirstofa, a special kind of Icelandic museum. Modern multimedia shows combined with a plethora of information offers visitors the opportunity to become informed about some of the inexplicable natural wonders of Iceland, and even feel it on your own body as is the case with the earthquake simulator for instance.
The upper half of the museum gives you a sneak peek into life on the island in earlier times, through carefully selected and presented exhibits, as well as four short videos about topics such as wool production, or milk and cheese processing.
Hotel Geysir was awarded the innovation prize of the Icelandic Tourist Board in 2000 for the Geysir Centre.

South Iceland

Towns & Villages

The south of Iceland has several towns and villages, each with its own style, charm and points of interest. Selfoss is the largest town and has a variety of shops, services, many restaurants and fast food places. Most towns are close to the main route, making them accessible and enjoyable.

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Map Höfn Kirkjubæjarklaustur Vík Vestmannaeyjar Hvolsvöllur Flúðir Laugarvatn Reykholt Laugarás Borg Brautarholt Hveragerði Árnes Selfoss Hella Stokkseyri Eyrarbakki Þykkvibær Þórlákshöfn