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EyjaTours

Experience Westman Islands in more PERSONAL and PRIVATE way with Eyjatours.

We offer Puffin tours around the island, private tours and custom made tours. Our goal is to make your trip magical and memorable so you will never forget this amazing Island. Eyjatours is fully licensed, local family tour operator here in Westman Islands. We are committed to provide excellent and personal service for travellers who want to enjoy and discover Westman Islands in more personal and private way. Our tours are guided by local guide with expert knowledge, personal attention and many years of experience.

EyjaTours

Básaskersbryggja

GPS Points N63° 26' 36.802" W20° 16' 19.398"
Telephone

+354 852-6939

Opening period All year
Service Open year round Credit cards accepted

Travel directory for EyjaTours

The official travel index of Iceland

Others

Syðri-Rot
Guesthouses
  • Syðri-Rot, Sandhólmsvegur
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
Glamping & Camping
Camping
  • Herjólfsdalur
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 846-9111, 863-4224
Guesthouse Árný
Guesthouses
  • Illugagata 7
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 6909998
Ofanleiti guesthouse and cottages
Guesthouses
  • Ofanleitisvegur 2
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 6942288, 661-1963
Hotel Eyjar Apartment Hotel
Apartments
  • Bárustígur 2
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 481-3636
Kátakot
Cottages
  • Miðkot
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
Hrafnabjörg guesthouse
Guesthouses
  • Hásteinsvegur 40
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 858-7727
Aska Hostel
Guesthouses
  • Bárustígur 11
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 662-7266
Vestmannaeyjar Camping Ground
Camping
  • Herjólfsdalur
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 846-9111
Lagafell
Guesthouses
  • Lágafell
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
  • 8918091, 897-8091
Nicehostel Seljalandsfoss
Hostels
  • Seljalandsskóli
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
  • 787-0100
Kross farmhouse
Farm Holidays
  • Kross 1a
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
  • 859-3515, 487-8515
Vestmannaeyjar HI Hostel
Hostels
  • Vestmannabraut 28
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 481-2900
Bergþórshvoll
Guesthouses
  • Bergþórshvoll 2
  • 861 Hvolsvöllur
  • 487-7715, 863-5901
Lava Guesthouse
Guesthouses
  • Bárustígur 13
  • 900 Vestmannaeyjar
  • 867-0068
Nature
1.46 km
Eldfell

Hiking to the top of the volcano Eldfell is one of the most popular trails on Heimaey. This volcano was created in the eruption in 1973 which lasted for about six months and during that time nearly one-third of all the homes and buildings on Heimaey had burned or been covered under the lava and ash. The volcanic museum, Eldheimar tells the story of the eruption and is very nice to visit prior to hiking up the volcano.

Nature
1.31 km
Herjolfsdalur

Herjólfsdalur is green and grassy, sheltered by an extinct volcano, and was the home of Vestmannaeyjar's first settler, Herjólfur Barðursson. Excavations have revealed remains of a Norse house where a replica now stands. The island's campsite is also here.

Nature
23.71 km
Seljalandsfoss waterfall

A unique waterfall in the river Seljalandsá, about 30 km west from Skógar. It is 60 meters high with a foot path behind it at the bottom of the cliff, but with a thin cascade. It is the only known waterfall of its kind, where it is possible to walk behind it. The waterfall is very picturesque and therefore its photo can be found in many books and calendars.

Access to the waterfall is from the farm of Seljaland along the Ring Road, Iceland's main highway. A little further to the west there are several other falls, among them the interesting Gljúfrabúi which is partially masked by its own canyon. Access to it is from Hamragarðar farm along the road, east of Markarfljót.

Both of these "do-not-miss" attractions lie very close to the main Ring Road at the base of the Eyjafjallajökull Glacier, on the road leading in to Thorsmörk.

Nature
22.76 km
Eyjafjoll

Eyjafjöll is a beautiful region of south Iceland, which is easily accessible and popular with visitors.

Nature
24.20 km
Gljúfrabúi

The waterfall Gljúfrabúi tumbles down from the Gljúfurá River. Its source is just north of Tröllagil (Troll Gorge) Canyon in the heath Hamragarðaheiði. It is a spring-fed river and less voluminous than its neighbour Seljalandsá River. The river runs from Tröllagilsmýri (Troll Gorge Marsh), a picturesque and fertile marsh in the heath. When the river emerges out of the marsh, it runs into the northern edge of a lava field which was formed in the volcanic eruptions in Eyjafjallajökull at the beginning of Holocene. There are several little waterfalls to be found in the river in the area.

Gljúfrabúi, which is 40 m tall, is on the land of the uninhabited farmstead Hamragarðar which the Rangá Foresty Society received as a gift in 1962 and is now owned by the municipality of Rangárþing eystra. There is a certain mystique over the waterfall because it falls into a deep chasm, while in front of it there is much palagonite rock that blocks the waterfall so that only the very top of it is visible. The boulder that blocks the waterfall is called Franskanef. Previously, people believed that it and the surrounding cliffs were the residences of huldufólk or hidden people. It is possible to climb onto Franskanef and see the waterfall from above. On the most risky parts there is a chain with which it is possible to support oneself; however, care must be taken if one climbs up and it is not for everybody. It is also possible to take off your shoes and wade the river down in the canyon. It's an amazing experience. Caution must be taken when travelling in the canyon because there is a risk of falling rocks. There is an old bath basin below Franskanef and at the inner end of the basin there is a little cave called Ömpuhellir, named after a hermit woman who lived there. Gljúfrabúi is a protected natural monument.

A little south of Gljúfrabúi there is a small canyon in the cliff face from which it is possible to ascend onto the heath above where there is a spectacular view of the neighbouring area. People referred to it as going up Stígurinn (the Path) and thus the river in that canyon is named Stígslækur (Path Brook). The path is still rather clear, with some stairs where it is steepest. Right above the edge, there are ruins of old sheepcotes from Hamragarðar.

Nature
22.82 km
Surtsey Island

Surtsey, on the UNESCO World Heritage list, from July 7, 2008

Surtsey, Iceland's youngest volcanic island, has been added to the prestigious UNESCO World Heritage list following the World Heritage Committee held in Quebec City on July 7, 2008.
"Surtur comes from the South... the hot stars down from Heaven are whirled. Fierce grows the steam and the life-feeding flame, until fire leaps high about Heaven itself."
- From the Icelandic poem Völuspá, ca. 950 A.D.

Surtsey is not only one of the world's newest islands, but the most filmed and researched and one of the most restricted. Ever since the eruption in 1963 which heaved it up out of the waters 18km (11 miles) south-west of Heimaey, its progress has been monitored. This has been giving scientists a fascinating insight into how a new island evolves, how flora and fauna develop and so on. Because of this very few people are now allowed to visit the island, and special permits are only granted for scientific research.
On the 14th of November, 1963 Icelandic seamen, that were fishing about 20 km southwest of Heimaey ( Vestmannaeyjar ) observed the beginnings of an undersea eruption that originated at a 130 meters depth. When the eruption first occurred, columns of ash were sent almost 9,146m (30,000 ft) into the sky and could be seen on clear days as far away as Reykjavík. An island eventually rose to a height of 169 metres above sea level that had an area of 2,5km².

This island was named Surtsey for Surtur, the fire possessing giant of Norse mythology who would set fire to the earth at the Last Judgment. Because of pounding seas, there was a considerable amount of early erosion, but the island core quickly solidified as rock and is now holding its own while scientists watch everything.

For three and a half years Surtsey rumbled and lava flowed. Long before the eruption stopped the island was proclaimed a nature preserve and all travel there was restricted to scientist that used this unique opportunity to study the gradual development of life on a sterile landmass. The first living found in the ash deposits close to shore. In May of the same year a fly was found on the island. Sea gulls visited the tide waters furthest from crater. The first vascular plant to flower along the shore was the sea rocket, observed in 1965. By 1987, twenty-five species of higher plants (including tomatoes!!) had been observed, transported there by seed in the sea currents, some from nearby island, other from the southern Icelandic coast 40 kilometres off. Other species of plants have been carried there by yhe winds or birds from Europe.
Surtsey is a favorite resting place for migratory birds during seasonal flights to and from Iceland and Europe. They visit there yearly by the thousands. Seals also visit the island and relax on its beaches. Today five species of birds nest on Surtsey: the Herring Gull, the Black Backed Gull, the Black Guillemot, The Kittiwake and Fulmar which was the first species to nest there and hatch its young on the warm lava in 1970. BBC and David Attenborough have produced acclaimed television programs from this amazing little island.

South Iceland

Towns & Villages

The south of Iceland has several towns and villages, each with its own style, charm and points of interest. Selfoss is the largest town and has a variety of shops, services, many restaurants and fast food places. Most towns are close to the main route, making them accessible and enjoyable.

Explore map by categories

Map Höfn Kirkjubæjarklaustur Vík Vestmannaeyjar Hvolsvöllur Flúðir Laugarvatn Reykholt Laugarás Borg Brautarholt Hveragerði Árnes Selfoss Hella Stokkseyri Eyrarbakki Þykkvibær Þórlákshöfn