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The three villages on the South Coast Lighthouse Trail, Stokkseyri, Eyrarbakki and Þorlákshöfn, are unique, each in its own way. They are all fishing villages, although nowadays fishing is only done from Þorlákshöfn. Eyrarbakki is the oldest village of those three. The oldest house in the village is called Húsið (e. the House) and was built in 1765. During the Danish king's monopoly Eyrarbakki was one of the largest towns in Iceland, even larger than Reykjavík. For a while, it looked like Eyrarbakki, with all its services and trade, would become the capital of the country. 

Around 1890, the formation of Stokkseyri began, and this period of development lasted until 1930. Wooden houses with corrugated iron gradually built up instead of the traditional turf houses. Today, the village is characterized by a mixture of old and new houses, an old fish processing factory and next to it the Stokkseyri Church. On the observation platform, south of the cemetery, you can find information about the lay of the land and place names.  

Þorlákshöfn gets its name from Þorlákur, the holy bishop of Skálholt (1133-1193). Þorlákshöfn possesses an excellent natural harbor and is close to rich fishing grounds. In the period when rowing boats were used it was common for 30-40 boats to be fishing from Þorlákshöfn, meaning that 300-400 people lived in the fishing station over the season, living in dwellings made of stone and turf. The current urban area was formed around the middle of last century following the development of a powerful fishing company Metill hf. There was also a significant increase in population in the seventies following the volcanic eruption in Heimaey in the Vestmannaeyjar archipelago. Extensive development has taken place in Þorlákshöfn in recent years. 

STOKKSEYRI
STOKKSEYRIStokkseyri, pop. 559 is a charming village renowned for its beautiful seashore, breaking ocean waves and birdlife, and rich in handicrafts and culture. Workshops, galleries, Ghost Center, and the Elves and Northern Lights Museum are all located in a Cultural Centre, Menningarverstöðin, an old fish processing factory that has found a new role due to changes in the fishing industry. The Wildlife Museum is dedicated to hunting and wildlife and contains many mammals and birds. The bunkhouse Þuríðarbúð provides an excellent example of how fishermen had to make use of what nature provided. Stokkseyri also offers one of Iceland's most famous seafood restaurants, an outdoor swimming pool, kayak tours, and a campsite. East of Stokkseyri is Knarrarósviti Lighthouse, built-in 1938 and put into operation a year later. For further information, visit the tourist information at the local Café, Gimli Kaffihús. ÁRBORGThe Municipality of Árborg was established in 1998. It consists of the town Selfoss, the villages of Eyrarbakki, Stokkseyri, and the Sandvík area. This region offers excellent options for recreation and relaxation, including a wide selection of restaurants, cafés, art galleries, museums, swimming pools, and a 9-hole golf course in Selfoss. A perfect location for any visitor who wants to stay closer to nature and explore unique landscapes such as large lava fields and black sand beaches.
EYRARBAKKI
Eyrarbakki, pop. 585 is a friendly village that used to be the largest commercial community and main harbor on the South Coast of Iceland. Many preserved houses from 1890 to 1920 are situated in Eyrarbakki, and a visit is, therefore, like going 100 years back in time. Other great attractions are The Eyrarbakki Maritime Museum and the Árnessýsla Folk Museum, which is located in a building constructed in 1765, famously known as “The House”. Here you can also find a campsite, hostel, guesthouses and a great restaurant. On the rocky shoreline is a fantastic view of the Atlantic Ocean, where you can watch the surf break. It is an ideal spot for hiking and bird watching. Passing the beautiful recreational forest Hallskot northwest of Eyrarbakki, you enter the Flói Bird Reserve. It is a significant nesting area, especially for wetland birds, and is listed as an Important Bird Area (IBA) by BirdLife International. ÁRBORG The Municipality of Árborg was established in 1998. It consists of the town Selfoss, the villages of Eyrarbakki, Stokkseyri, and the Sandvík area. This region offers excellent options for recreation and relaxation, including a wide selection of restaurants, cafés, art galleries, museums, swimming pools, and a 9-hole golf course in Selfoss. A perfect location for any visitor who wants to stay closer to nature and explore unique landscapes such as large lava fields and black sand beaches.
ÞORLÁKSHÖFN
The main town in Ölfus is Þorlákshöfn, west of Eyrarbakki. The town is important as a port because the only viable harbour on Iceland's southern coast between Grindavík in the west and Höfn in the east is situated there. The town has a population of about 1500 people. The industrial foundations in Þorlákshöfn are ship-outfitting and fish processing factories, with business and service industries growing fast. Leisure opportunities for tourists are excellent, with an outdoor swimming pool with hot baths, a steam bath and a brand new waterslide. A good campsite is next door to the pool, with indoor cooking facilities and spaces for mobile homes. From the swimming pool you can select many walking routes in the surrounding area and longer walks along the coast, leading all the way to Selvogur and Herdísarvík, and along the beach leading to Óseyrarbrú and Eyrarbakki. In the Egilsbúð library and museum items that tell the story of the development of the town are to be found. The town church in Þorlákshöfn is built in a unique style, and Strandarkirkja church in Engilsvík in Selvogur is famous as a place for vows. Anyone wishing to go caving has the Raufarhólshellir caves, which are some 1360 metres long. Duggan in Thorlákshöfn and Skíðaskálinn in Hveradalir offer many services to travellers, among them food and drink. Many scenes in the epic blockbuster movie "Flags of our Fathers" (directed by Clint Eastwood and produced by Steven Spielberg - 2005) were filmed on the black beaches close to Þorlákshöfn. There are also plans to construct a big international golf course close to Þorlákshöfn.
Selvogur
Selvogur is the westernmost settlement of Árnessýsla. The countryside is relatively small, and the land resources there are scarce. Even though Selvogur had been a somewhat isolated settlement in earlier centuries and conditions along the coastline were challenging, many people lived there, and much exploration was practiced there during the winter. Most of the settlements in Selvogur have now been abandoned, but there are now three farms there. Ruins and meadows peek out of the ground and give an insight into the life of previous centuries, but now there is permanent residence on three farms. Significant places in Selvogur include Herdísarvík and Strandakirkja. Herdísarvík was previously a large farm in Selvogur but is now deserted. Herdísarvík stands by the vast and open cove of the same name. Above the town is Herdísarvíkurfjall (329 m). Herdísarvík was formerly a well-known fishing station with several sea camps, and there you can still see the ruins of many of them. Also, see rock gardens in the lava where the fish was dried. These monuments were all protected in 1973, and Herdísarvík was declared a nature reserve in 1988. The poet Einar Benediktsson (1864-1940) lived in Herdísarvík for the last years of his life. He donated the land to the University of Iceland in 1935.  Strandakirkja is a church by Engilvík on Suðurstrandavegur. The church was a church of the inhabitants of Selvogur, and a priest lived in Vogsós until it was closed down in 1907. Strandakirkja is nationally famous for its promises and rituals, and it is visited by thousands of visitors every year.